Hans and Birgit Kaufmann and their family want to visit a park which is historically important. Their teenage children would like to try a water sport.PARKS IN AND AROUND THE CITYE Boscawen ParkThis small and peaceful park offers guided tours, given by the knowledgeable Environment Officers, and evening visitors to the park may be lucky enough to see rare frogs and bats. It is situated on the River Elton and can be reached in about 30 minutes from the city centre by river taxi. There is a snack bar and gift shop.F East Bank ParkThis is a tiny, little-known park in the heart of the city, with gardens filled with sculptures, trees and flowers. It makes a perfect resting place, popular with local artists, and is within minutes of the theatre and entertainment district.G Victoria ParkThis quiet park, on the edge of the city and easy to visit by public transport, has boats for hire on the lake, a skateboard park, basketball and tennis courts and a picnic area. Often seen in postcard views of the city, Victoria Park contains one of the oldest windmills in the country - the museum should not be missed.H Elmwood ParkAt Elmwood Park, there are walks on well-made paths and cycle rides for all abilities. Elmwood is just inside the city limit and has an area of quiet woodland, which is home to deer and other animals. The visitor centre, numerous display boards and a fun quiz make this a positive learning experience for all agesWhich park would be the most suitable for Hans and Birgit Kaufmann?
check_box Victoria Park
East Bank Park
Boscawen Park
Elmwood Park
Isabel works in the city centre and likes painting and drawing in her free time. She wants to practise her hobby in a small, quiet park near her office.PARKS IN AND AROUND THE CITYE Boscawen ParkThis small and peaceful park offers guided tours, given by the knowledgeable Environment Officers, and evening visitors to the park may be lucky enough to see rare frogs and bats. It is situated on the River Elton and can be reached in about 30 minutes from the city centre by river taxi. There is a snack bar and gift shop.F East Bank ParkThis is a tiny, little-known park in the heart of the city, with gardens filled with sculptures, trees and flowers. It makes a perfect resting place, popular with local artists, and is within minutes of the theatre and entertainment district.G Victoria ParkThis quiet park, on the edge of the city and easy to visit by public transport, has boats for hire on the lake, a skateboard park, basketball and tennis courts and a picnic area. Often seen in postcard views of the city, Victoria Park contains one of the oldest windmills in the country - the museum should not be missed.H Elmwood ParkAt Elmwood Park, there are walks on well-made paths and cycle rides for all abilities. Elmwood is just inside the city limit and has an area of quiet woodland, which is home to deer and other animals. The visitor centre, numerous display boards and a fun quiz make this a positive learning experience for all agesWhich park would be the most suitable for Isabel?
Boscawen Park
East Bank Park
Elmwood Park
Victoria Park
Klara has recently moved to London and enjoys serious running. She is looking for a club where she can take part in competitions.. FIND THE PERFECT WAY TO KEEP FIT WITH THESE WEBSITESA www.activelife.co.uk This site is perfect for those who like to combine living a healthy lifestyle with enjoying the countryside. Type in the name of the town and you get a list of locations that offer routes for cycling or exploring the area on foot. There is also information on cycling competitions in Britain.B www.fitinfo.com This online shop offers books, magazines, DVDs and software connected to keeping fit. You simply type in the aspect of keeping fit that you are interested in, such as ‘keeping fit outdoors’, and a super selection is displayed.C www.fitnet.co.uk Steve Amos started this site for busy people wanting to keep fit. Fill in a questionnaire and Steve will create a fitness programme for you. Although Steve's fee is high, you can email him for advice whenever you want. In addition, Steve has designed a range of fitness clothes and footwear, which anyone can order (48-hour delivery).D www.NAG.co.uk The National Athletics Group is a site for people interested in athletics. It allows you to find out where your nearest athletics club is and provides information about races and other athletics events around the country. There is a popular chatroom where athletes exchange suggestions and ideas.Decide which website would be the most suitable for Klara.
www.fitnet.co.uk
www.activelife.co.uk
www.NAG.co.uk
www.fitinfo.com
Kumiko and Atsuko would like to visit a park which they can get to by boat. They want to buy lunch there and then enjoy a short walk accompanied by an expert leader.PARKS IN AND AROUND THE CITYE Boscawen ParkThis small and peaceful park offers guided tours, given by the knowledgeable Environment Officers, and evening visitors to the park may be lucky enough to see rare frogs and bats. It is situated on the River Elton and can be reached in about 30 minutes from the city centre by river taxi. There is a snack bar and gift shop.F East Bank ParkThis is a tiny, little-known park in the heart of the city, with gardens filled with sculptures, trees and flowers. It makes a perfect resting place, popular with local artists, and is within minutes of the theatre and entertainment district.G Victoria ParkThis quiet park, on the edge of the city and easy to visit by public transport, has boats for hire on the lake, a skateboard park, basketball and tennis courts and a picnic area. Often seen in postcard views of the city, Victoria Park contains one of the oldest windmills in the country - the museum should not be missed.H Elmwood ParkAt Elmwood Park, there are walks on well-made paths and cycle rides for all abilities. Elmwood is just inside the city limit and has an area of quiet woodland, which is home to deer and other animals. The visitor centre, numerous display boards and a fun quiz make this a positive learning experience for all agesWhich park would be the most suitable for Kumiko and Atsuko?
check_box Boscawen Park
Victoria Park
East Bank Park
Elmwood Park
Kumiko is a member of a local gym where she goes at least twice a week. She umiko is a member of a local gym where she goes at least twice a week. She does not get much time to shop, so wants to buy gym clothes and shoes online. FIND THE PERFECT WAY TO KEEP FIT WITH THESE WEBSITES A www.activelife.co.uk This site is perfect for those who like to combine living a healthy lifestyle with enjoying the countryside. Type in the name of the town and you get a list of locations that offer routes for cycling or exploring the area on foot. There is also information on cycling competitions in Britain. B www.fitinfo.com This online shop offers books, magazines, DVDs and software connected to keeping fit. You simply type in the aspect of keeping fit that you are interested in, such as ‘keeping fit outdoors’, and a super selection is displayed.C www.fitnet.co.uk Steve Amos started this site for busy people wanting to keep fit. Fill in a questionnaire and Steve will create a fitness programme for you. Although Steve's fee is high, you can email him for advice whenever you want. In addition, Steve has designed a range of fitness clothes and footwear, which anyone can order (48-hour delivery).D www.NAG.co.uk The National Athletics Group is a site for people interested in athletics. It allows you to find out where your nearest athletics club is and provides information about races and other athletics events around the country. There is a popular chatroom where athletes exchange suggestions and ideas.Decide which website would be the most suitable for Kumiko?
www.NAG.co.uk
www.activelife.co.uk
www.fitinfo.com
www.fitnet.co.uk
Melanie and Stefan are students who need to visit a busy park for a college project. They want to draw people taking part in team sports and watching entertainment.PARKS IN AND AROUND THE CITYA Hadley ParkThis park is in the peaceful village of Cranford, 20 km outside the city. The park has large green spaces for football and there is also an area of woodland, a boating lake, fish ponds and a variety of local wildlife. The public car park is free.B Highdown ParkThe largest and most popular open space in the city, Highdown has many paths for keen walkers, as well as horse-riding and golf. The much-visited 19th-century glasshouses contain an interesting exhibition about birds from around the world.C Brock ParkA beautiful park on the edge of the city, Brock Park attracts huge crowds. The open-air theatre has a programme of plays suitable for school groups. There is a well-used basketball court and baseball field, a children’s playground and a cafe. Climb Harry’s Hill to admire the beautiful fields and forests beyond the city.D Lilac Park and HouseThis busy city-centre park has a long history dating back to the 1700s, when it belonged to the writer Thomas Crane. The house is open to the public and a guided visit can also include a walk around the famous rose gardens, finishing at the popular Butterfly Cafe.Which park would be the most suitable for Melanie and Stefan?
check_box Brock Park
Lilac Park and House
Highdown Park
Hadley Park
Mr Martin wants to take his eight-year-old pupils to a park anywhere within the city, with lots of organised activities which allow the children to read about local wildlife they may see.PARKS IN AND AROUND THE CITYE Boscawen ParkThis small and peaceful park offers guided tours, given by the knowledgeable Environment Officers, and evening visitors to the park may be lucky enough to see rare frogs and bats. It is situated on the River Elton and can be reached in about 30 minutes from the city centre by river taxi. There is a snack bar and gift shop.F East Bank ParkThis is a tiny, little-known park in the heart of the city, with gardens filled with sculptures, trees and flowers. It makes a perfect resting place, popular with local artists, and is within minutes of the theatre and entertainment district.G Victoria ParkThis quiet park, on the edge of the city and easy to visit by public transport, has boats for hire on the lake, a skateboard park, basketball and tennis courts and a picnic area. Often seen in postcard views of the city, Victoria Park contains one of the oldest windmills in the country - the museum should not be missed.H Elmwood ParkAt Elmwood Park, there are walks on well-made paths and cycle rides for all abilities. Elmwood is just inside the city limit and has an area of quiet woodland, which is home to deer and other animals. The visitor centre, numerous display boards and a fun quiz make this a positive learning experience for all ages.Which park would be the most suitable for Martin?
Victoria Park
Boscawen Park
East Bank Park
Elmwood Park
Peter loves the outdoors and cycles to different places each weekend to keep fit. He wants a website which will give him suggestions for a range of suitable destinations.FIND THE PERFECT WAY TO KEEP FIT WITH THESE WEBSITES A www.activelife.co.uk This site is perfect for those who like to combine living a healthy lifestyle with enjoying the countryside. Type in the name of the town and you get a list of locations that offer routes for cycling or exploring the area on foot. There is also information on cycling competitions in Britain. B www.fitinfo.com This online shop offers books, magazines, DVDs and software connected to keeping fit. You simply type in the aspect of keeping fit that you are interested in, such as ‘keeping fit outdoors’, and a super selection is displayed.C www.fitnet.co.uk Steve Amos started this site for busy people wanting to keep fit. Fill in a questionnaire and Steve will create a fitness programme for you. Although Steve's fee is high, you can email him for advice whenever you want. In addition, Steve has designed a range of fitness clothes and footwear, which anyone can order (48-hour delivery).D www.NAG.co.uk The National Athletics Group is a site for people interested in athletics. It allows you to find out where your nearest athletics club is and provides information about races and other athletics events around the country. There is a popular chatroom where athletes exchange suggestions and ideas.Decide which website would be the most suitable for Peter?
check_box www.activelife.co.uk
www.NAG.co.uk
www.fitinfo.com
www.fitnet.co.uk
Read the article and choose the correct answer, A, B, C or D.According to airline industry statistics, almost 90 percent of airline accidents are survivable or partially survivable. But passengers can increase their chances of survival by learning and following certain tips. Experts say that you should read and listen to safety instructions before takeoff and ask questions if you have uncertainties. You should fasten your seat-belt low on your hips and as tightly as possible. Of course, you should also know how the release mechanism of your belt operates. During takeoffs and landings, you are advised to keep your feet flat on the floor. Before takeoff you should locate the nearest exit and an alterative exit and count the rows of seats between you and the exits so that you can find them in the dark if necessary.In the event that you are forewarned of a possible accident, you should put your hands on your ankles and keep your head down until the plane comes to a complete stop. If smoke is present in the cabin, you should keep your head low and cover your face with napkins, towels, or clothing. If possible, wet these for added protection against smoke inhalation. To evacuate as quickly as possible, follow crew commands and do not take personal belongings with you. Do not jump on escape slides before they are fully inflated, and when you jump, do so with your arms and legs extended in front of you. When you get to the ground, you should move away from the plane as quickly as possible, and never smoke near the wreckage.According to the passage, which exits should an airline passenger locate before takeoff?
The nearest one
The ones that can be found in the dark
The ones with counted rows of seats between them
The two closest to the passenger’s seat
Read the article and choose the correct answer, A, B, C or D.According to airline industry statistics, almost 90 percent of airline accidents are survivable or partially survivable. But passengers can increase their chances of survival by learning and following certain tips. Experts say that you should read and listen to safety instructions before takeoff and ask questions if you have uncertainties. You should fasten your seat-belt low on your hips and as tightly as possible. Of course, you should also know how the release mechanism of your belt operates. During takeoffs and landings, you are advised to keep your feet flat on the floor. Before takeoff you should locate the nearest exit and an alterative exit and count the rows of seats between you and the exits so that you can find them in the dark if necessary.In the event that you are forewarned of a possible accident, you should put your hands on your ankles and keep your head down until the plane comes to a complete stop. If smoke is present in the cabin, you should keep your head low and cover your face with napkins, towels, or clothing. If possible, wet these for added protection against smoke inhalation. To evacuate as quickly as possible, follow crew commands and do not take personal belongings with you. Do not jump on escape slides before they are fully inflated, and when you jump, do so with your arms and legs extended in front of you. When you get to the ground, you should move away from the plane as quickly as possible, and never smoke near the wreckage.Choose the best answer.According to the passage, airline travelers should keep their feet flat on the floor…….…….
during takeoffs and landings.
especially during landings.
only if an accident is possible.
throughout the flight.
Read the article and choose the correct answer, A, B, C or D.According to airline industry statistics, almost 90 percent of airline accidents are survivable or partially survivable. But passengers can increase their chances of survival by learning and following certain tips. Experts say that you should read and listen to safety instructions before takeoff and ask questions if you have uncertainties. You should fasten your seat-belt low on your hips and as tightly as possible. Of course, you should also know how the release mechanism of your belt operates. During takeoffs and landings, you are advised to keep your feet flat on the floor. Before takeoff you should locate the nearest exit and an alterative exit and count the rows of seats between you and the exits so that you can find them in the dark if necessary.In the event that you are forewarned of a possible accident, you should put your hands on your ankles and keep your head down until the plane comes to a complete stop. If smoke is present in the cabin, you should keep your head low and cover your face with napkins, towels, or clothing. If possible, wet these for added protection against smoke inhalation. To evacuate as quickly as possible, follow crew commands and do not take personal belongings with you. Do not jump on escape slides before they are fully inflated, and when you jump, do so with your arms and legs extended in front of you. When you get to the ground, you should move away from the plane as quickly as possible, and never smoke near the wreckage.It can be inferred from the passage that people are more likely to survive fires in aircrafts if they…
don’t smoke in or near a plane.
keep their heads low.
read airline safety statistics.
wear a safety belt.
Read the article and choose the correct answer, A, B, C or D.According to airline industry statistics, almost 90 percent of airline accidents are survivable or partially survivable. But passengers can increase their chances of survival by learning and following certain tips. Experts say that you should read and listen to safety instructions before takeoff and ask questions if you have uncertainties. You should fasten your seat-belt low on your hips and as tightly as possible. Of course, you should also know how the release mechanism of your belt operates. During takeoffs and landings, you are advised to keep your feet flat on the floor. Before takeoff you should locate the nearest exit and an alterative exit and count the rows of seats between you and the exits so that you can find them in the dark if necessary.In the event that you are forewarned of a possible accident, you should put your hands on your ankles and keep your head down until the plane comes to a complete stop. If smoke is present in the cabin, you should keep your head low and cover your face with napkins, towels, or clothing. If possible, wet these for added protection against smoke inhalation. To evacuate as quickly as possible, follow crew commands and do not take personal belongings with you. Do not jump on escape slides before they are fully inflated, and when you jump, do so with your arms and legs extended in front of you. When you get to the ground, you should move away from the plane as quickly as possible, and never smoke near the wreckage.Travelers are urged by experts to read and listen to safety instructions ……………
before locating the exits.
before takeoff.
if smoke is in the cabin
in an emergency.
Read the article and choose the correct answer, A, B, C or D.According to airline industry statistics, almost 90 percent of airline accidents are survivable or partially survivable. But passengers can increase their chances of survival by learning and following certain tips. Experts say that you should read and listen to safety instructions before takeoff and ask questions if you have uncertainties. You should fasten your seat-belt low on your hips and as tightly as possible. Of course, you should also know how the release mechanism of your belt operates. During takeoffs and landings, you are advised to keep your feet flat on the floor. Before takeoff you should locate the nearest exit and an alterative exit and count the rows of seats between you and the exits so that you can find them in the dark if necessary.In the event that you are forewarned of a possible accident, you should put your hands on your ankles and keep your head down until the plane comes to a complete stop. If smoke is present in the cabin, you should keep your head low and cover your face with napkins, towels, or clothing. If possible, wet these for added protection against smoke inhalation. To evacuate as quickly as possible, follow crew commands and do not take personal belongings with you. Do not jump on escape slides before they are fully inflated, and when you jump, do so with your arms and legs extended in front of you. When you get to the ground, you should move away from the plane as quickly as possible, and never smoke near the wreckage.What is the main topic of the passage?
Airline industry accident statistics
Guidelines for increasing aircraft passenger survival
Procedures for evacuating aircraft
Safety instructions in air travel
Read the article and choose the correct answer, A, B, C or D.Bramley College now has full electronic information resources in the College Library to help you in your studies. On CD-ROM in the library we have about fifty databases, including many statistical sources. Want to know the average rainfall in Tokyo or the biggest export earner of Vanuatu? It's easy to find out. Whether you are in the School of Business or the School of Art Design, it's all here for you. You can conduct your own CD-ROM search for no charge, and you can print out your results on the library printers using your library photocopying card. Alternatively, you can download your results to disk, again for no charge, but bring your own formatted floppy disk or CD-ROM. If you are not sure how to conduct a search for yourself, library staff can do it for you, but we charge $20 for this service, no matter how long or how short a time it takes.All library workstations have broadband access to the Internet, so you can find the web-based information you need quickly and easily. If you are unfamiliar with using the Internet, help is available in several ways. You can start with the online tutorial Netstart; just click on the Netstart icon the Main Menu. The tutorial will take you through the basic steps to using the Internet, any time convenient to you. If you prefer, ask one of the librarians for internet advice (best at quiet times between 9.00am and 11.30 am weekdays) or attend one of the introductory group sessions that are held in the first two weeks of each term. Sign your name on the list on the library Bulletin Board to guarantee a place, as they are very popular. A word of warning: demand for access to library workstations is very high, so you are strongly advised to book a workstation, and we have to limit your use to a maximum of one hour at any one time. Make your booking (for which you will receive a receipt) at the Information Desk at the enquiry desks in the Media Services Area (Level 1). Also, use of the computers is limited to Bramley students only, so you may be asked to produce your Student Identification Card to make a booking, or while using the workstations.If library staff search for information on CD-ROM, students pay
$20
a fee based on actual costs.
a fee dependent on the time taken.
No fee
Read the article and choose the correct answer, A, B, C or D.Bramley College now has full electronic information resources in the College Library to help you in your studies. On CD-ROM in the library we have about fifty databases, including many statistical sources. Want to know the average rainfall in Tokyo or the biggest export earner of Vanuatu? It's easy to find out. Whether you are in the School of Business or the School of Art Design, it's all here for you. You can conduct your own CD-ROM search for no charge, and you can print out your results on the library printers using your library photocopying card. Alternatively, you can download your results to disk, again for no charge, but bring your own formatted floppy disk or CD-ROM. If you are not sure how to conduct a search for yourself, library staff can do it for you, but we charge $20 for this service, no matter how long or how short a time it takes.All library workstations have broadband access to the Internet, so you can find the web-based information you need quickly and easily. If you are unfamiliar with using the Internet, help is available in several ways. You can start with the online tutorial Netstart; just click on the Netstart icon the Main Menu. The tutorial will take you through the basic steps to using the Internet, any time convenient to you. If you prefer, ask one of the librarians for internet advice (best at quiet times between 9.00am and 11.30 am weekdays) or attend one of the introductory group sessions that are held in the first two weeks of each term. Sign your name on the list on the library Bulletin Board to guarantee a place, as they are very popular. A word of warning: demand for access to library workstations is very high, so you are strongly advised to book a workstation, and we have to limit your use to a maximum of one hour at any one time. Make your booking (for which you will receive a receipt) at the Information Desk at the enquiry desks in the Media Services Area (Level 1). Also, use of the computers is limited to Bramley students only, so you may be asked to produce your Student Identification Card to make a booking, or while using the workstations.Students can learn to use the Internet…
at all times.
between 9.00am and 11.30am only
in the first two weeks of term only.
Monday to Friday only.
Read the article and choose the correct answer, A, B, C or D.Bramley College now has full electronic information resources in the College Library to help you in your studies. On CD-ROM in the library we have about fifty databases, including many statistical sources. Want to know the average rainfall in Tokyo or the biggest export earner of Vanuatu? It's easy to find out. Whether you are in the School of Business or the School of Art Design, it's all here for you. You can conduct your own CD-ROM search for no charge, and you can print out your results on the library printers using your library photocopying card. Alternatively, you can download your results to disk, again for no charge, but bring your own formatted floppy disk or CD-ROM. If you are not sure how to conduct a search for yourself, library staff can do it for you, but we charge $20 for this service, no matter how long or how short a time it takes.All library workstations have broadband access to the Internet, so you can find the web-based information you need quickly and easily. If you are unfamiliar with using the Internet, help is available in several ways. You can start with the online tutorial Netstart; just click on the Netstart icon the Main Menu. The tutorial will take you through the basic steps to using the Internet, any time convenient to you. If you prefer, ask one of the librarians for internet advice (best at quiet times between 9.00am and 11.30 am weekdays) or attend one of the introductory group sessions that are held in the first two weeks of each term. Sign your name on the list on the library Bulletin Board to guarantee a place, as they are very popular. A word of warning: demand for access to library workstations is very high, so you are strongly advised to book a workstation, and we have to limit your use to a maximum of one hour at any one time. Make your booking (for which you will receive a receipt) at the Information Desk at the enquiry desks in the Media Services Area (Level 1). Also, use of the computers is limited to Bramley students only, so you may be asked to produce your Student Identification Card to make a booking, or while using the workstations.To copy search results to a floppy disk, students pay…
$20
a fee based on actual costs.
a fee dependent on the time taken.
No fee
Read the article and choose the correct answer, A, B, C or D.Bramley College now has full electronic information resources in the College Library to help you in your studies. On CD-ROM in the library we have about fifty databases, including many statistical sources. Want to know the average rainfall in Tokyo or the biggest export earner of Vanuatu? It's easy to find out. Whether you are in the School of Business or the School of Art Design, it's all here for you. You can conduct your own CD-ROM search for no charge, and you can print out your results on the library printers using your library photocopying card. Alternatively, you can download your results to disk, again for no charge, but bring your own formatted floppy disk or CD-ROM. If you are not sure how to conduct a search for yourself, library staff can do it for you, but we charge $20 for this service, no matter how long or how short a time it takes.All library workstations have broadband access to the Internet, so you can find the web-based information you need quickly and easily. If you are unfamiliar with using the Internet, help is available in several ways. You can start with the online tutorial Netstart; just click on the Netstart icon the Main Menu. The tutorial will take you through the basic steps to using the Internet, any time convenient to you. If you prefer, ask one of the librarians for internet advice (best at quiet times between 9.00am and 11.30 am weekdays) or attend one of the introductory group sessions that are held in the first two weeks of each term. Sign your name on the list on the library Bulletin Board to guarantee a place, as they are very popular. A word of warning: demand for access to library workstations is very high, so you are strongly advised to book a workstation, and we have to limit your use to a maximum of one hour at any one time. Make your booking (for which you will receive a receipt) at the Information Desk at the enquiry desks in the Media Services Area (Level 1). Also, use of the computers is limited to Bramley students only, so you may be asked to produce your Student Identification Card to make a booking, or while using the workstations.To ensure efficient access to the library workstations, students should…
conduct as many searches as possible at one time.
queue to use a workstation in the Media Services Area.
reserve a time to use a workstation.
work in groups on one workstation.
Read the article and choose the correct answer, A, B, C or D.Bramley College now has full electronic information resources in the College Library to help you in your studies. On CD-ROM in the library we have about fifty databases, including many statistical sources. Want to know the average rainfall in Tokyo or the biggest export earner of Vanuatu? It's easy to find out. Whether you are in the School of Business or the School of Art Design, it's all here for you. You can conduct your own CD-ROM search for no charge, and you can print out your results on the library printers using your library photocopying card. Alternatively, you can download your results to disk, again for no charge, but bring your own formatted floppy disk or CD-ROM. If you are not sure how to conduct a search for yourself, library staff can do it for you, but we charge $20 for this service, no matter how long or how short a time it takes.All library workstations have broadband access to the Internet, so you can find the web-based information you need quickly and easily. If you are unfamiliar with using the Internet, help is available in several ways. You can start with the online tutorial Netstart; just click on the Netstart icon the Main Menu. The tutorial will take you through the basic steps to using the Internet, any time convenient to you. If you prefer, ask one of the librarians for internet advice (best at quiet times between 9.00am and 11.30 am weekdays) or attend one of the introductory group sessions that are held in the first two weeks of each term. Sign your name on the list on the library Bulletin Board to guarantee a place, as they are very popular. A word of warning: demand for access to library workstations is very high, so you are strongly advised to book a workstation, and we have to limit your use to a maximum of one hour at any one time. Make your booking (for which you will receive a receipt) at the Information Desk at the enquiry desks in the Media Services Area (Level 1). Also, use of the computers is limited to Bramley students only, so you may be asked to produce your Student Identification Card to make a booking, or while using the workstations.To use the library printers, students must have…
a floppy disk.
a photocopying card.
correct change in coins.
their own paper.
Read the passage and answer the question. Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future. The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required. Anyone can set up a site; promoting your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself, is what the Web and the Internet is all about. And what is more, information on the Internet is not owned or controlled by anyone organisation. It is, perhaps, true to say that no-one and therefore everyone owns the 'Net'. Because of the relative freedom of access to information, the Internet has often been criticised by the media as a potentially hazardous tool in the hands of young computer users. This perception has proved to be largely false however, and the vast majority of users both young and old get connected with the Internet for the dual purposes for which it was intended – discovery and delight.Almost everyone is ........... of the Information Superhighway.
Aware
Cared
Concerned
Confirmed
Read the passage and answer the question. Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future. The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required. Anyone can set up a site; promoting your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself, is what the Web and the Internet is all about. And what is more, information on the Internet is not owned or controlled by anyone organisation. It is, perhaps, true to say that no-one and therefore everyone owns the 'Net'. Because of the relative freedom of access to information, the Internet has often been criticised by the media as a potentially hazardous tool in the hands of young computer users. This perception has proved to be largely false however, and the vast majority of users both young and old get connected with the Internet for the dual purposes for which it was intended – discovery and delight.Internet computer connections are made by using ........... .
A mouse
electric wires.
Internet addresses or sites
telephone lines
Read the passage and answer the question. Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future. The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required. Anyone can set up a site; promoting your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself, is what the Web and the Internet is all about. And what is more, information on the Internet is not owned or controlled by anyone organisation. It is, perhaps, true to say that no-one and therefore everyone owns the 'Net'. Because of the relative freedom of access to information, the Internet has often been criticised by the media as a potentially hazardous tool in the hands of young computer users. This perception has proved to be largely false however, and the vast majority of users both young and old get connected with the Internet for the dual purposes for which it was intended – discovery and delight.To what does pronoun "IT" in the passage refer?
Internet address
The cost of using the Internet
The future of the Internet
The Information Superhighway
Read the passage and answer the question. Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future. The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required. Anyone can set up a site; promoting your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself, is what the Web and the Internet is all about. And what is more, information on the Internet is not owned or controlled by anyone organisation. It is, perhaps, true to say that no-one and therefore everyone owns the 'Net'. Because of the relative freedom of access to information, the Internet has often been criticised by the media as a potentially hazardous tool in the hands of young computer users. This perception has proved to be largely false however, and the vast majority of users both young and old get connected with the Internet for the dual purposes for which it was intended – discovery and delight.To what does pronoun "WHICH" in the passage refer?
Advertising on the World Wide Web
Internet addresses or sites
The Educational Hope of the Future
The Internet Revolution
Read the passage and answer the question. Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future. The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required. Anyone can set up a site; promoting your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself, is what the Web and the Internet is all about. And what is more, information on the Internet is not owned or controlled by anyone organisation. It is, perhaps, true to say that no-one and therefore everyone owns the 'Net'. Because of the relative freedom of access to information, the Internet has often been criticised by the media as a potentially hazardous tool in the hands of young computer users. This perception has proved to be largely false however, and the vast majority of users both young and old get connected with the Internet for the dual purposes for which it was intended – discovery and delight.What is the main point of the first paragraph?
Almost everyone has heard of the Information Superhighway.
No-one knows where the Information Superhighway is headed.
The Internet will revolutionise the way people communicate.
You need a modem and an address to use the Internet.
Read the passage and answer the question. Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future. The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required. Anyone can set up a site; promoting your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself, is what the Web and the Internet is all about. And what is more, information on the Internet is not owned or controlled by anyone organisation. It is, perhaps, true to say that no-one and therefore everyone owns the 'Net'. Because of the relative freedom of access to information, the Internet has often been criticised by the media as a potentially hazardous tool in the hands of young computer users. This perception has proved to be largely false however, and the vast majority of users both young and old get connected with the Internet for the dual purposes for which it was intended – discovery and delight.What is the meaning of the word "hazardous"?
dangerous
Good
interesting
UsefuL
Read the passage and answer the question. Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future. The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required. Anyone can set up a site; promoting your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself, is what the Web and the Internet is all about. And what is more, information on the Internet is not owned or controlled by anyone organisation. It is, perhaps, true to say that no-one and therefore everyone owns the 'Net'. Because of the relative freedom of access to information, the Internet has often been criticised by the media as a potentially hazardous tool in the hands of young computer users. This perception has proved to be largely false however, and the vast majority of users both young and old get connected with the Internet for the dual purposes for which it was intended – discovery and delight.What would the next paragraph to follow the passage probably be about?
Abuse of the Internet by youth
Advertising on the World Wide Web
The cost of using the Internet
The future of the Internet
Read the passage and answer the question. Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future. The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required. Anyone can set up a site; promoting your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself, is what the Web and the Internet is all about. And what is more, information on the Internet is not owned or controlled by anyone organisation. It is, perhaps, true to say that no-one and therefore everyone owns the 'Net'. Because of the relative freedom of access to information, the Internet has often been criticised by the media as a potentially hazardous tool in the hands of young computer users. This perception has proved to be largely false however, and the vast majority of users both young and old get connected with the Internet for the dual purposes for which it was intended – discovery and delight.Which is the best title for the passage ?
How to Use the Internet
The Educational Hope of the Future
The Internet Revolution
The World Wide Web
Read the passage and answer the question. Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future. The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required. Anyone can set up a site; promoting your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself, is what the Web and the Internet is all about. And what is more, information on the Internet is not owned or controlled by anyone organisation. It is, perhaps, true to say that no-one and therefore everyone owns the 'Net'. Because of the relative freedom of access to information, the Internet has often been criticised by the media as a potentially hazardous tool in the hands of young computer users. This perception has proved to be largely false however, and the vast majority of users both young and old get connected with the Internet for the dual purposes for which it was intended – discovery and delight.Which is the topic sentence of the second paragraph?
none of the above
Sentence number one
Sentence number two
The last sentence
Read the passage and answer the question. Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future. The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required. Anyone can set up a site; promoting your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself, is what the Web and the Internet is all about. And what is more, information on the Internet is not owned or controlled by anyone organisation. It is, perhaps, true to say that no-one and therefore everyone owns the 'Net'. Because of the relative freedom of access to information, the Internet has often been criticised by the media as a potentially hazardous tool in the hands of young computer users. This perception has proved to be largely false however, and the vast majority of users both young and old get connected with the Internet for the dual purposes for which it was intended – discovery and delight.You can......... a site to promote your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself.
Begin
Locate
Open
Set up
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTERPATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLETA Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time. B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years. D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception. F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency. G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number.Which section contains the following information? ............. who to speak to first for general information
Section B
Section E
Section F
Section G
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTERPATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLETA Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time. B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years. D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception. F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency. G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of yourQuesstion: Helen Stranger is the Head Nurse.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTERPATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLETA Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time. B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years. D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception. F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency. G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of yourQuestion: If you want a repeat prescription you must make an appointment.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTERPATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLETA Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time. B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years. D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception. F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency. G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of yourQuestion: It is possible that receptionists will ask you to explain your problem.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTERPATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLETA Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time. B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years. D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception. F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency. G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of yourQuestion: Services of private certificates are covered by Caustion Health Centre.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTERPATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLETA Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time. B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years. D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception. F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency. G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of yourQuestion: You must always see the same doctor if you visit the Centre.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTERPATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLETA Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time. B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years. D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception. F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency. G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of yourQuestion: You should give the Health Centre your new contact details if you move house.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTERPATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLETA Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time. B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years. D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception. F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency. G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of yourWhich section contains the following information? ............. what happens when you register with the Centre
Section A
Section C
Section D
Section F
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTERPATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLETA Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time. B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years. D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception. F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency. G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of yourWhich section contains the following information? ............. what to do if you need to cancel a doctor's appointment
Section A
Section B
Section D
Section G
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number. Which section contains the following information? ............. what to do if you need help outside normal working hours     F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Which section contains the following information? ............. what to do if you need help outside normal working hours
Section A
Section B
Section C
Section F
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Quesstion: Helen Stranger is the Head Nurse.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Question: If you want a repeat prescription you must make an appointment.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Question: It is possible that receptionists will ask you to explain your problem.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Question: Services of private certificates are covered by Caustion Health Centre.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Question: You must always see the same doctor if you visit the Centre.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Question: You should give the Health Centre your new contact details if you move house.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Which section contains the following information? ............. what happens when you register with the Centre
Section A
Section C
Section D
Section F
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Which section contains the following information? ............. what to do if you need to cancel a doctor's appointment
Section A
Section B
Section D
Section G
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number. Which section contains the following information? ............. what to do if you need help outside normal working hours
Section A
Section B
Section C
Section F
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number. Which section contains the following information? ............. who to speak to first for general information
Section B
Section E
Section F
Section G
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Quesstion: Helen Stranger is the Head Nurse.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Question: If you want a repeat prescription you must make an appointment.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Question: It is possible that receptionists will ask you to explain your problem.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Question: Services of private certificates are covered by Caustion Health Centre.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Question: You must always see the same doctor if you visit the Centre.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Question: You should give the Health Centre your new contact details if you move house.
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Which section contains the following information? ............. what happens when you register with the Centre
Section A
Section C
Section D
Section F
Read the passage below and answer the questions. CAUSTION HEALTH CENTER PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET A Appointments Please telephone 826969 (8.30am - 5.00pm: Mon - Fri). We suggest that you try to see the same doctor whenever possible because it is helpful for both you and your doctor to know each other well. We try hard to keep our appointments running to time, and ask you to be punctual to help us achieve this; if you cannot keep an appointment, please phone in and let us know as soon as possible so that it can be used for someone else. Please try to avoid evening appointments if possible. Each appointment is for one person only. Please ask for a longer appointment if you need more time.   B Weekends and Nights Please telephone 823307 and a recorded message will give you the number of the doctor from the Centre on duty. Please remember this is in addition to our normal working day. Urgent calls only please. A Saturday morning emergency surgery is available between 9.30am and 10.00am. Please telephone for home visits before 10.00am at weekends.   C Centre Nurses Liz Stuart, Martina Scott and Helen Stranger are available daily by appointment to help you with dressings, ear syringing, and children’s immunisations, removal of stitches and blood tests. They will also advise on foreign travel, and can administer various injections and blood pressure checks. For any over 75s unable to attend the clinic, Helen Stranger will make a home visit. All three Centre Nurses are available during normal working hours to carry out health checks on patients who have been on doctors' lists for 3 years.   D New Patients Within 3 months of registering with the Centre, new patients on regular medication are invited to attend a health check with their doctor. Other patients can arrange to be seen by one of the Centre Nurses.   E Services Not Covered Some services are not covered by the Centre e.g. private certificates, insurance, driving and sports medicals, passport signatures, school medicals and prescriptions for foreign travel. There are recommended fees for these set by the National Medical Association. Please ask at reception.   F Receptionists Our receptionists provide your primary point of contact - they are all very experienced and have a lot of basic information at their fingertips. They will be able to answer many of your initial queries and also act as a link with the rest of the team. They may request brief details of your symptoms or illness - this enables the doctors to assess the degree of urgency.   G Change of Address Please remember to let us know if you decide to relocate. It is also useful for us to have a record of your telephone number   Which section contains the following information? ............. what to do if you need to cancel a doctor's appointment
Section A
Section B
Section D
Section G
Read the text and answer the question.An example of a bizarre occurrence regarding a species of frog dates from the summer of 1995, when 'an explosion' of multi-coloured frogs of the species Rana klepton esculenta occurred in the Netherlands. Normally these frogs are brown and greenish-brown, but some unknown contributory factor is turning these frogs yellow and/or orange. Nonetheless, so far, the unusual bi- and even tri-coloured frogs are functioning similarly to their normal-skinned contemporaries. It is thought that frogs with lighter coloured skins might be more likely to survive in an increasingly warm climate due to global warming.What is best heading for the paragraph?
check_box Possible adaption of frogs to the environment.
Frogs making changes to the ecosystem.
Multi-coloured frog species cause problems
The mystery of amphibian decline.
Read the text and answer the question.Barack Obama was as surprised as most of America, and much of the world, when he was woken up and told he had won the Nobel Peace Prize after just nine months as president and while he is still deciding whether to escalate the war in Afghanistan. The Nobel Committee said it chose Obama “for his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples” and for creating “a new international climate”.How long had Barack Obama been US president when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize?
nine months
five months
three months
eight months
Read the text and answer the question.Botany, the study of plants, occupies a peculiar position in the history of human knowledge. For many thousands of years it was the one field of awareness about which humans had anything more than the vaguest of insights. It is impossible to know today just what our Stone Age ancestors knew about plant, but from what we can observe of preindustrial societies that still exist, a detailed learning of plants and their properties must be extremely ancient. This is logical. Plants are the basis of the food pyramid for all living things, even for other plants. They have always been enormously important to the welfare of people, not only for food, but also for clothing, weapons, tools, dyes, medicines, shelter, and a great many other purposes. Tribes living today in the jungles of the Amazon recognize literally hundreds of plants and know many properties of each. To them botany, as such, has no name and is probably not even recognized as a special branch of “knowledge” at all.Unfortunately, the more industrialized we become the farther away we move from direct contact with plants, and the less distinct our knowledge of botany grows. Yet everyone comes unconsciously on an amazing amount of botanical knowledge, and few people will fail to recognize a rose, an apple, or an orchid. When our Neolithic ancestors, living in the Middle East about 10,000 years ago, discovered that certain grasses could be harvested and their seeds planted for richer yields the next season, the first great step in a new association of plants and humans was taken. Grains were discovered and from them flowed the marvel of agriculture: cultivated crops. From then on, humans would increasingly take their living from the controlled production of a few plants, rather than getting a little here and a little there from many varieties that grew wild — and the accumulated knowledge of tens of thousands of years of experience and intimacy with plants in the wild would begin to fade away.According to the passage, what was the first great step toward the practice of agriculture?
check_box The discovery of grasses that could be harvested and replanted
The changing diets of early humans
The invention of agricultural implements and machinery[u]ents[/]
The development of a system ofnames for plants
Read the text and answer the question.Botany, the study of plants, occupies a peculiar position in the history of human knowledge. For many thousands of years it was the one field of awareness about which humans had anything more than the vaguest of insights. It is impossible to know today just what our Stone Age ancestors knew about plant, but from what we can observe of preindustrial societies that still exist, a detailed learning of plants and their properties must be extremely ancient. This is logical. Plants are the basis of the food pyramid for all living things, even for other plants. They have always been enormously important to the welfare of people, not only for food, but also for clothing, weapons, tools, dyes, medicines, shelter, and a great many other purposes. Tribes living today in the jungles of the Amazon recognize literally hundreds of plants and know many properties of each. To them botany, as such, has no name and is probably not even recognized as a special branch of “knowledge” at all.Unfortunately, the more industrialized we become the farther away we move from direct contact with plants, and the less distinct our knowledge of botany grows. Yet everyone comes unconsciously on an amazing amount of botanical knowledge, and few people will fail to recognize a rose, an apple, or an orchid. When our Neolithic ancestors, living in the Middle East about 10,000 years ago, discovered that certain grasses could be harvested and their seeds planted for richer yields the next season, the first great step in a new association of plants and humans was taken. Grains were discovered and from them flowed the marvel of agriculture: cultivated crops. From then on, humans would increasingly take their living from the controlled production of a few plants, rather than getting a little here and a little there from many varieties that grew wild — and the accumulated knowledge of tens of thousands of years of experience and intimacy with plants in the wild would begin to fade away.According to the passage, why has general knowledge of botany declined?
check_box Direct contact with a variety of plants has decreased.
Research is unable to keep up with the increasing number of plants.
People no longer value plants as a useful resource.
Botany is not recognized as a special branch of science.
Read the text and answer the question.Botany, the study of plants, occupies a peculiar position in the history of human knowledge. For many thousands of years it was the one field of awareness about which humans had anything more than the vaguest of insights. It is impossible to know today just what our Stone Age ancestors knew about plant, but from what we can observe of preindustrial societies that still exist, a detailed learning of plants and their properties must be extremely ancient. This is logical. Plants are the basis of the food pyramid for all living things, even for other plants. They have always been enormously important to the welfare of people, not only for food, but also for clothing, weapons, tools, dyes, medicines, shelter, and a great many other purposes. Tribes living today in the jungles of the Amazon recognize literally hundreds of plants and know many properties of each. To them botany, as such, has no name and is probably not even recognized as a special branch of “knowledge” at all.Unfortunately, the more industrialized we become the farther away we move from direct contact with plants, and the less distinct our knowledge of botany grows. Yet everyone comes unconsciously on an amazing amount of botanical knowledge, and few people will fail to recognize a rose, an apple, or an orchid. When our Neolithic ancestors, living in the Middle East about 10,000 years ago, discovered that certain grasses could be harvested and their seeds planted for richer yields the next season, the first great step in a new association of plants and humans was taken. Grains were discovered and from them flowed the marvel of agriculture: cultivated crops. From then on, humans would increasingly take their living from the controlled production of a few plants, rather than getting a little here and a little there from many varieties that grew wild — and the accumulated knowledge of tens of thousands of years of experience and intimacy with plants in the wild would begin to fade away.In which sentence does the author describe the benefits people derive from plants?
check_box Plants are the basis of the food pyramid for all living things, even for other plants.
Yet everyone comes unconsciously on an amazing amount of botanical knowledge, and few people will fail to recognize a rose, an apple, or an orchid.
Botany, the study of plants, occupies a peculiar position in the history of human knowledge.
To them botany, as such, has no name and is probably not even recognized as a special branch of “knowledge” at all.
Read the text and answer the question.Botany, the study of plants, occupies a peculiar position in the history of human knowledge. For many thousands of years it was the one field of awareness about which humans had anything more than the vaguest of insights. It is impossible to know today just what our Stone Age ancestors knew about plant, but from what we can observe of preindustrial societies that still exist, a detailed learning of plants and their properties must be extremely ancient. This is logical. Plants are the basis of the food pyramid for all living things, even for other plants. They have always been enormously important to the welfare of people, not only for food, but also for clothing, weapons, tools, dyes, medicines, shelter, and a great many other purposes. Tribes living today in the jungles of the Amazon recognize literally hundreds of plants and know many properties of each. To them botany, as such, has no name and is probably not even recognized as a special branch of “knowledge” at all.Unfortunately, the more industrialized we become the farther away we move from direct contact with plants, and the less distinct our knowledge of botany grows. Yet everyone comes unconsciously on an amazing amount of botanical knowledge, and few people will fail to recognize a rose, an apple, or an orchid. When our Neolithic ancestors, living in the Middle East about 10,000 years ago, discovered that certain grasses could be harvested and their seeds planted for richer yields the next season, the first great step in a new association of plants and humans was taken. Grains were discovered and from them flowed the marvel of agriculture: cultivated crops. From then on, humans would increasingly take their living from the controlled production of a few plants, rather than getting a little here and a little there from many varieties that grew wild — and the accumulated knowledge of tens of thousands of years of experience and intimacy with plants in the wild would begin to fade away.The phrase “properties of each” refers to each
tribe
purpose
plant
hundred
Read the text and answer the question.Botany, the study of plants, occupies a peculiar position in the history of human knowledge. For many thousands of years it was the one field of awareness about which humans had anything more than the vaguest of insights. It is impossible to know today just what our Stone Age ancestors knew about plant, but from what we can observe of preindustrial societies that still exist, a detailed learning of plants and their properties must be extremely ancient. This is logical. Plants are the basis of the food pyramid for all living things, even for other plants. They have always been enormously important to the welfare of people, not only for food, but also for clothing, weapons, tools, dyes, medicines, shelter, and a great many other purposes. Tribes living today in the jungles of the Amazon recognize literally hundreds of plants and know many properties of each. To them botany, as such, has no name and is probably not even recognized as a special branch of “knowledge” at all.Unfortunately, the more industrialized we become the farther away we move from direct contact with plants, and the less distinct our knowledge of botany grows. Yet everyone comes unconsciously on an amazing amount of botanical knowledge, and few people will fail to recognize a rose, an apple, or an orchid. When our Neolithic ancestors, living in the Middle East about 10,000 years ago, discovered that certain grasses could be harvested and their seeds planted for richer yields the next season, the first great step in a new association of plants and humans was taken. Grains were discovered and from them flowed the marvel of agriculture: cultivated crops. From then on, humans would increasingly take their living from the controlled production of a few plants, rather than getting a little here and a little there from many varieties that grew wild — and the accumulated knowledge of tens of thousands of years of experience and intimacy with plants in the wild would begin to fade away.The word '‘peculiar” in is closest in meaning to
check_box unusual
large
clear
important
Read the text and answer the question.Botany, the study of plants, occupies a peculiar position in the history of human knowledge. For many thousands of years it was the one field of awareness about which humans had anything more than the vaguest of insights. It is impossible to know today just what our Stone Age ancestors knew about plant, but from what we can observe of preindustrial societies that still exist, a detailed learning of plants and their properties must be extremely ancient. This is logical. Plants are the basis of the food pyramid for all living things, even for other plants. They have always been enormously important to the welfare of people, not only for food, but also for clothing, weapons, tools, dyes, medicines, shelter, and a great many other purposes. Tribes living today in the jungles of the Amazon recognize literally hundreds of plants and know many properties of each. To them botany, as such, has no name and is probably not even recognized as a special branch of “knowledge” at all.Unfortunately, the more industrialized we become the farther away we move from direct contact with plants, and the less distinct our knowledge of botany grows. Yet everyone comes unconsciously on an amazing amount of botanical knowledge, and few people will fail to recognize a rose, an apple, or an orchid. When our Neolithic ancestors, living in the Middle East about 10,000 years ago, discovered that certain grasses could be harvested and their seeds planted for richer yields the next season, the first great step in a new association of plants and humans was taken. Grains were discovered and from them flowed the marvel of agriculture: cultivated crops. From then on, humans would increasingly take their living from the controlled production of a few plants, rather than getting a little here and a little there from many varieties that grew wild — and the accumulated knowledge of tens of thousands of years of experience and intimacy with plants in the wild would begin to fade away.The word “controlled” is closest in meaning to
check_box managed
advanced
required
abundant
Read the text and answer the question.Botany, the study of plants, occupies a peculiar position in the history of human knowledge. For many thousands of years it was the one field of awareness about which humans had anything more than the vaguest of insights. It is impossible to know today just what our Stone Age ancestors knew about plant, but from what we can observe of preindustrial societies that still exist, a detailed learning of plants and their properties must be extremely ancient. This is logical. Plants are the basis of the food pyramid for all living things, even for other plants. They have always been enormously important to the welfare of people, not only for food, but also for clothing, weapons, tools, dyes, medicines, shelter, and a great many other purposes. Tribes living today in the jungles of the Amazon recognize literally hundreds of plants and know many properties of each. To them botany, as such, has no name and is probably not even recognized as a special branch of “knowledge” at all.Unfortunately, the more industrialized we become the farther away we move from direct contact with plants, and the less distinct our knowledge of botany grows. Yet everyone comes unconsciously on an amazing amount of botanical knowledge, and few people will fail to recognize a rose, an apple, or an orchid. When our Neolithic ancestors, living in the Middle East about 10,000 years ago, discovered that certain grasses could be harvested and their seeds planted for richer yields the next season, the first great step in a new association of plants and humans was taken. Grains were discovered and from them flowed the marvel of agriculture: cultivated crops. From then on, humans would increasingly take their living from the controlled production of a few plants, rather than getting a little here and a little there from many varieties that grew wild — and the accumulated knowledge of tens of thousands of years of experience and intimacy with plants in the wild would begin to fade away.What does the comment “This is logical” mean?
Human knowledge of plants is well organized and very detailed.
There is no clear way to determine the extent of our ancestors' knowledge of plants.
It is not surprising that early humans had a detailed knowledge of plants.
It is reasonable to assume that our ancestors behaved very much like people in preindustrial societies.
Read the text and answer the question.Botany, the study of plants, occupies a peculiar position in the history of human knowledge. For many thousands of years it was the one field of awareness about which humans had anything more than the vaguest of insights. It is impossible to know today just what our Stone Age ancestors knew about plant, but from what we can observe of preindustrial societies that still exist, a detailed learning of plants and their properties must be extremely ancient. This is logical. Plants are the basis of the food pyramid for all living things, even for other plants. They have always been enormously important to the welfare of people, not only for food, but also for clothing, weapons, tools, dyes, medicines, shelter, and a great many other purposes. Tribes living today in the jungles of the Amazon recognize literally hundreds of plants and know many properties of each. To them botany, as such, has no name and is probably not even recognized as a special branch of “knowledge” at all.Unfortunately, the more industrialized we become the farther away we move from direct contact with plants, and the less distinct our knowledge of botany grows. Yet everyone comes unconsciously on an amazing amount of botanical knowledge, and few people will fail to recognize a rose, an apple, or an orchid. When our Neolithic ancestors, living in the Middle East about 10,000 years ago, discovered that certain grasses could be harvested and their seeds planted for richer yields the next season, the first great step in a new association of plants and humans was taken. Grains were discovered and from them flowed the marvel of agriculture: cultivated crops. From then on, humans would increasingly take their living from the controlled production of a few plants, rather than getting a little here and a little there from many varieties that grew wild — and the accumulated knowledge of tens of thousands of years of experience and intimacy with plants in the wild would begin to fade away.what is the author’s purpose in mentioning "a rose, an apple, or an orchid’’?
To illustrate the diversity of botanical life
To give botanical examples that most readers will recognize
To cite examples of plants that are attractive
To make the passage more poetic
Read the text and answer the question.Botany, the study of plants, occupies a peculiar position in the history of human knowledge. For many thousands of years it was the one field of awareness about which humans had anything more than the vaguest of insights. It is impossible to know today just what our Stone Age ancestors knew about plant, but from what we can observe of preindustrial societies that still exist, a detailed learning of plants and their properties must be extremely ancient. This is logical. Plants are the basis of the food pyramid for all living things, even for other plants. They have always been enormously important to the welfare of people, not only for food, but also for clothing, weapons, tools, dyes, medicines, shelter, and a great many other purposes. Tribes living today in the jungles of the Amazon recognize literally hundreds of plants and know many properties of each. To them botany, as such, has no name and is probably not even recognized as a special branch of “knowledge” at all.Unfortunately, the more industrialized we become the farther away we move from direct contact with plants, and the less distinct our knowledge of botany grows. Yet everyone comes unconsciously on an amazing amount of botanical knowledge, and few people will fail to recognize a rose, an apple, or an orchid. When our Neolithic ancestors, living in the Middle East about 10,000 years ago, discovered that certain grasses could be harvested and their seeds planted for richer yields the next season, the first great step in a new association of plants and humans was taken. Grains were discovered and from them flowed the marvel of agriculture: cultivated crops. From then on, humans would increasingly take their living from the controlled production of a few plants, rather than getting a little here and a little there from many varieties that grew wild — and the accumulated knowledge of tens of thousands of years of experience and intimacy with plants in the wild would begin to fade away.Which of the following assumptions about early humans is expressed in the passage?
check_box They probably had extensive knowledge of plants.
They did not enjoy the study of botany.
They placed great importance on ownership of property.
They divided knowledge into well-defined fields.
Read the text and answer the question.One theory put forward to explain extinct amphibian species that seems to fit the facts concerns the depletion of the ozone layer, a well-documented phenomenon which has led to a sharp increase in ultraviolet radiation levels. The ozone layer is meant to shield the Earth from UV rays, but increased radiation may be having a greater effect upon frog populations than previously believed. Another theory is that worldwide temperature increases are upsetting the breeding cycles of frogs.What is best heading for the paragraph?
Theories concerning the demise of frogs.
Multi-coloured frog species cause problems
The mystery of amphibian decline.
Frogs making changes to the ecosystem.
Read the text and answer the question.PARKS IN AND AROUND THE CITYA Hadley ParkThis park is in the peaceful village of Cranford, 20 km outside the city. The park has large green spaces for football and there is also an area of woodland, a boating lake, fish ponds and a variety of local wildlife. The public car park is free.B Highdown ParkThe largest and most popular open space in the city, Highdown has many paths for keen walkers, as well as horse-riding and golf. The much-visited 19th-century glasshouses contain an interesting exhibition about birds from around the world.C Brock ParkA beautiful park on the edge of the city, Brock Park attracts huge crowds. The open-air theatre has a programme of plays suitable for school groups. There is a well-used basketball court and baseball field, a children’s playground and a cafe. Climb Harry’s Hill to admire the beautiful fields and forests beyond the city.D Lilac Park and HouseThis busy city-centre park has a long history dating back to the 1700s, when it belonged to the writer Thomas Crane. The house is open to the public and a guided visit can also include a walk around the famous rose gardens, finishing at the popular Butterfly Cafe.Which park has an interesting exhibition about birds from around the world?
Highdown Park
Lilac Park and House
Brock Park
Hadley Park
Read the text and answer the question.PARKS IN AND AROUND THE CITYA Hadley ParkThis park is in the peaceful village of Cranford, 20 km outside the city. The park has large green spaces for football and there is also an area of woodland, a boating lake, fish ponds and a variety of local wildlife. The public car park is free.B Highdown ParkThe largest and most popular open space in the city, Highdown has many paths for keen walkers, as well as horse-riding and golf. The much-visited 19th-century glasshouses contain an interesting exhibition about birds from around the world.C Brock ParkA beautiful park on the edge of the city, Brock Park attracts huge crowds. The open-air theatre has a programme of plays suitable for school groups. There is a well-used basketball court and baseball field, a children’s playground and a cafe. Climb Harry’s Hill to admire the beautiful fields and forests beyond the city.D Lilac Park and HouseThis busy city-centre park has a long history dating back to the 1700s, when it belonged to the writer Thomas Crane. The house is open to the public and a guided visit can also include a walk around the famous rose gardens, finishing at the popular Butterfly Cafe.Which park has free public car park?
check_box Hadley Park
Brock Park
Lilac Park and House
Highdown Park
Read the text and answer the question.PARKS IN AND AROUND THE CITYA Hadley ParkThis park is in the peaceful village of Cranford, 20 km outside the city. The park has large green spaces for football and there is also an area of woodland, a boating lake, fish ponds and a variety of local wildlife. The public car park is free.B Highdown ParkThe largest and most popular open space in the city, Highdown has many paths for keen walkers, as well as horse-riding and golf. The much-visited 19th-century glasshouses contain an interesting exhibition about birds from around the world.C Brock ParkA beautiful park on the edge of the city, Brock Park attracts huge crowds. The open-air theatre has a programme of plays suitable for school groups. There is a well-used basketball court and baseball field, a children’s playground and a cafe. Climb Harry’s Hill to admire the beautiful fields and forests beyond the city.D Lilac Park and HouseThis busy city-centre park has a long history dating back to the 1700s, when it belonged to the writer Thomas Crane. The house is open to the public and a guided visit can also include a walk around the famous rose gardens, finishing at the popular Butterfly Cafe.Which park is in the city-centre?
Brock Park
Highdown Park
Lilac Park and House
Hadley Park
Read the text and answer the question.PARKS IN AND AROUND THE CITYA Hadley ParkThis park is in the peaceful village of Cranford, 20 km outside the city. The park has large green spaces for football and there is also an area of woodland, a boating lake, fish ponds and a variety of local wildlife. The public car park is free.B Highdown ParkThe largest and most popular open space in the city, Highdown has many paths for keen walkers, as well as horse-riding and golf. The much-visited 19th-century glasshouses contain an interesting exhibition about birds from around the world.C Brock ParkA beautiful park on the edge of the city, Brock Park attracts huge crowds. The open-air theatre has a programme of plays suitable for school groups. There is a well-used basketball court and baseball field, a children’s playground and a cafe. Climb Harry’s Hill to admire the beautiful fields and forests beyond the city.D Lilac Park and HouseThis busy city-centre park has a long history dating back to the 1700s, when it belonged to the writer Thomas Crane. The house is open to the public and a guided visit can also include a walk around the famous rose gardens, finishing at the popular Butterfly Cafe.Which park is the largest and most popular open space in the city?
Brock Park
Hadley Park
Highdown Park
Lilac Park and House
Read the text and answer the question.PARKS IN AND AROUND THE CITYA Hadley ParkThis park is in the peaceful village of Cranford, 20 km outside the city. The park has large green spaces for football and there is also an area of woodland, a boating lake, fish ponds and a variety of local wildlife. The public car park is free.B Highdown ParkThe largest and most popular open space in the city, Highdown has many paths for keen walkers, as well as horse-riding and golf. The much-visited 19th-century glasshouses contain an interesting exhibition about birds from around the world.C Brock ParkA beautiful park on the edge of the city, Brock Park attracts huge crowds. The open-air theatre has a programme of plays suitable for school groups. There is a well-used basketball court and baseball field, a children’s playground and a cafe. Climb Harry’s Hill to admire the beautiful fields and forests beyond the city.D Lilac Park and HouseThis busy city-centre park has a long history dating back to the 1700s, when it belonged to the writer Thomas Crane. The house is open to the public and a guided visit can also include a walk around the famous rose gardens, finishing at the popular Butterfly Cafe.Which park suitable for school groups?
check_box Brock Park
Highdown Park
Hadley Park
Lilac Park and House
Read the text and answer the question.PARKS IN AND AROUND THE CITYA Hadley ParkThis park is in the peaceful village of Cranford, 20 km outside the city. The park has large green spaces for football and there is also an area of woodland, a boating lake, fish ponds and a variety of local wildlife. The public car park is free.B Highdown ParkThe largest and most popular open space in the city, Highdown has many paths for keen walkers, as well as horse-riding and golf. The much-visited 19th-century glasshouses contain an interesting exhibition about birds from around the world.C Brock ParkA beautiful park on the edge of the city, Brock Park attracts huge crowds. The open-air theatre has a programme of plays suitable for school groups. There is a well-used basketball court and baseball field, a children’s playground and a cafe. Climb Harry’s Hill to admire the beautiful fields and forests beyond the city.D Lilac Park and HouseThis busy city-centre park has a long history dating back to the 1700s, when it belonged to the writer Thomas Crane. The house is open to the public and a guided visit can also include a walk around the famous rose gardens, finishing at the popular Butterfly Cafe.Which park would be suitable for walking-lovers?
Hadley Park
Highdown Park
Brock Park
Lilac Park and House
Read the text and answer the question.PARKS IN AND AROUND THE CITYE Boscawen ParkThis small and peaceful park offers guided tours, given by the knowledgeable Environment Officers, and evening visitors to the park may be lucky enough to see rare frogs and bats. It is situated on the River Elton and can be reached in about 30 minutes from the city centre by river taxi. There is a snack bar and gift shop.F East Bank ParkThis is a tiny, little-known park in the heart of the city, with gardens filled with sculptures, trees and flowers. It makes a perfect resting place, popular with local artists, and is within minutes of the theatre and entertainment district.G Victoria ParkThis quiet park, on the edge of the city and easy to visit by public transport, has boats for hire on the lake, a skateboard park, basketball and tennis courts and a picnic area. Often seen in postcard views of the city, Victoria Park contains one of the oldest windmills in the country - the museum should not be missed.H Elmwood ParkAt Elmwood Park, there are walks on well-made paths and cycle rides for all abilities. Elmwood is just inside the city limit and has an area of quiet woodland, which is home to deer and other animals. The visitor centre, numerous display boards and a fun quiz make this a positive learning experience for all agesIn Which park could the visitor see rare frogs and bats?
check_box Boscawen Park
Elmwood Park
Victoria Park
East Bank Park
Read the text and answer the question.PARKS IN AND AROUND THE CITYE Boscawen ParkThis small and peaceful park offers guided tours, given by the knowledgeable Environment Officers, and evening visitors to the park may be lucky enough to see rare frogs and bats. It is situated on the River Elton and can be reached in about 30 minutes from the city centre by river taxi. There is a snack bar and gift shop.F East Bank ParkThis is a tiny, little-known park in the heart of the city, with gardens filled with sculptures, trees and flowers. It makes a perfect resting place, popular with local artists, and is within minutes of the theatre and entertainment district.G Victoria ParkThis quiet park, on the edge of the city and easy to visit by public transport, has boats for hire on the lake, a skateboard park, basketball and tennis courts and a picnic area. Often seen in postcard views of the city, Victoria Park contains one of the oldest windmills in the country - the museum should not be missed.H Elmwood ParkAt Elmwood Park, there are walks on well-made paths and cycle rides for all abilities. Elmwood is just inside the city limit and has an area of quiet woodland, which is home to deer and other animals. The visitor centre, numerous display boards and a fun quiz make this a positive learning experience for all agesWhich park would the visitors easily get to by public transport?
Elmwood Park
Boscawen Park
Victoria Park
East Bank Park
Read the text and answer the question.People appear to be born to compute. The numerical skills of children develop so early and so inexorably that it is easy to imagine an internal clock of mathematical maturity guiding their growth. Not long after learning to walk and talk, they can set the table with impressive accuracy — one plate, oneknife, one spoon, one fork, for each of the five chairs. Soon they are capable of noting that they have placed five knives, spoons, and forks on the table and, a bit later, that this amounts to fifteen pieces of silverware. Having thus mastered addition, they move on to subtraction. It seems almost reasonable to expect that if a child were secluded on a desert island at birth and retrieved seven years later, he or she could enter a second-grade mathematics class without any serious problems of intellectual adjustment.Of course, the truth is not so simple. This century, the work of cognitive psychologists has illuminated the subtle forms of daily learning on which intellectual progress depends. Children were observed as they slowly grasped — or, as the case might be, bumped into — concepts that adults take for granted, as they refused, for instance, to concede that quantity is unchanged as water pours from a short stout glass into a tall thin one. Psychologists have since demonstrated that young children, asked to count the pencils in a pile, readily report the number of blue or red pencils, but must be coaxed into finding the total. Such studies have suggested that the rudiments of mathematics are mastered gradually, and with effort. They have also suggested that the very concept of abstract numbers — the idea of a oneness, a twoness, a threeness that applies to any class of objects and is a prerequisite for doing anything more mathematically demanding than setting a table — is itself far from innate.It can be inferred from the passage that children normally leam simple counting
they reach second grade inschool
by looking at the clock
soon after they leam to talk
when they begin to be mathematically mature
Read the text and answer the question.People appear to be born to compute. The numerical skills of children develop so early and so inexorably that it is easy to imagine an internal clock of mathematical maturity guiding their growth. Not long after learning to walk and talk, they can set the table with impressive accuracy — one plate, oneknife, one spoon, one fork, for each of the five chairs. Soon they are capable of noting that theyhave placed five knives, spoons, and forks on the table and, a bit later, that this amounts to fifteen pieces of silverware. Having thus mastered addition, they move on to subtraction. It seems almost reasonable to expect that if a child were secluded on a desert island at birth and retrieved seven years later, he or she could enter a second-grade mathematics class without any serious problems of intellectual adjustment.Of course, the truth is not so simple. This century, the work of cognitive psychologists has illuminated the subtle forms of daily learning on which intellectual progress depends. Children were observed as they slowly grasped — or, as the case might be, bumped into — concepts that adults take for granted, as they refused, for instance, to concede that quantity is unchanged as water pours from a short stout glass into a tall thin one. Psychologists have since demonstrated that young children, asked to count the pencils in a pile, readily report the number of blue or red pencils, but must be coaxed into finding the total. Such studies have suggested that the rudiments of mathematics are mastered gradually, and with effort. They have also suggested that the very concept of abstract numbers — the idea of a oneness, a twoness, a threeness that applies to any class of objects and is a prerequisite for doing anything more mathematically demanding than setting a table — is itself far from innate.In which sentence does the author give an example of a hypothetical experiment?
It seems almost reasonable to expect that if a child were secluded on a desert island at birth and retrieved seven years later, he or she could enter a second-grade mathematics class without any serious problems of intellectual adjustment.
They have also suggested that the very concept of abstract numbers — the idea of a oneness, a twoness, a threeness that applies to any class of objects and is a prerequisite for doing anything more mathematically demanding than setting a table — is itself far from innate.
Not long after learning to walk and talk, they can set the table with impressive accuracy — one plate, one knife, one spoon, one fork, for each of the five chairs.
. Children were observed as they slowly grasped — or, as the case might be, bumped into — concepts that adults take for granted, as they refused, for instance, to concede that quantity is unchanged as water pours from a short stout glass into a tall thin one.
Read the text and answer the question.People appear to be born to compute. The numerical skills of children develop so early and so inexorably that it is easy to imagine an internal clock of mathematical maturity guiding their growth. Not long after learning to walk and talk, they can set the table with impressive accuracy — one plate, oneknife, one spoon, one fork, for each of the five chairs. Soon they are capable of noting that theyhave placed five knives, spoons, and forks on the table and, a bit later, that this amounts to fifteen pieces of silverware. Having thus mastered addition, they move on to subtraction. It seems almost reasonable to expect that if a child were secluded on a desert island at birth and retrieved seven years later, he or she could enter a second-grade mathematics class without any serious problems of intellectual adjustment.Of course, the truth is not so simple. This century, the work of cognitive psychologists has illuminated the subtle forms of daily learning on which intellectual progress depends. Children were observed as they slowly grasped — or, as the case might be, bumped into — concepts that adults take for granted, as they refused, for instance, to concede that quantity is unchanged as water pours from a short stout glass into a tall thin one. Psychologists have since demonstrated that young children, asked to count the pencils in a pile, readily report the number of blue or red pencils, but must be coaxed into finding the total. Such studies have suggested that the rudiments of mathematics are mastered gradually, and with effort. They have also suggested that the very concept of abstract numbers — the idea of a oneness, a twoness, a threeness that applies to any class of objects and is a prerequisite for doing anything more mathematically demanding than setting a table — is itself far from innate.The author implies that most small children believe that the quantity of water changes when it is transferred to a container of a different
weight
shape
quality
colour
Read the text and answer the question.People appear to be born to compute. The numerical skills of children develop so early and so inexorably that it is easy to imagine an internal clock of mathematical maturity guiding their growth. Not long after learning to walk and talk, they can set the table with impressive accuracy — one plate, oneknife, one spoon, one fork, for each of the five chairs. Soon they are capable of noting that theyhave placed five knives, spoons, and forks on the table and, a bit later, that this amounts to fifteen pieces of silverware. Having thus mastered addition, they move on to subtraction. It seems almost reasonable to expect that if a child were secluded on a desert island at birth and retrieved seven years later, he or she could enter a second-grade mathematics class without any serious problems of intellectual adjustment.Of course, the truth is not so simple. This century, the work of cognitive psychologists has illuminated the subtle forms of daily learning on which intellectual progress depends. Children were observed as they slowly grasped — or, as the case might be, bumped into — concepts that adults take for granted, as they refused, for instance, to concede that quantity is unchanged as water pours from a short stout glass into a tall thin one. Psychologists have since demonstrated that young children, asked to count the pencils in a pile, readily report the number of blue or red pencils, but must be coaxed into finding the total. Such studies have suggested that the rudiments of mathematics are mastered gradually, and with effort. They have also suggested that the very concept of abstract numbers — the idea of a oneness, a twoness, a threeness that applies to any class of objects and is a prerequisite for doing anything more mathematically demanding than setting a table — is itself far from innate.The word '‘prerequisite” is closest in meaning to
requirement
theory
technique
reason
Read the text and answer the question.People appear to be born to compute. The numerical skills of children develop so early and so inexorably that it is easy to imagine an internal clock of mathematical maturity guiding their growth. Not long after learning to walk and talk, they can set the table with impressive accuracy — one plate, oneknife, one spoon, one fork, for each of the five chairs. Soon they are capable of noting that theyhave placed five knives, spoons, and forks on the table and, a bit later, that this amounts to fifteen pieces of silverware. Having thus mastered addition, they move on to subtraction. It seems almost reasonable to expect that if a child were secluded on a desert island at birth and retrieved seven years later, he or she could enter a second-grade mathematics class without any serious problems of intellectual adjustment.Of course, the truth is not so simple. This century, the work of cognitive psychologists has illuminated the subtle forms of daily learning on which intellectual progress depends. Children were observed as they slowly grasped — or, as the case might be, bumped into — concepts that adults take for granted, as they refused, for instance, to concede that quantity is unchanged as water pours from a short stout glass into a tall thin one. Psychologists have since demonstrated that young children, asked to count the pencils in a pile, readily report the number of blue or red pencils, but must be coaxed into finding the total. Such studies have suggested that the rudiments of mathematics are mastered gradually, and with effort. They have also suggested that the very concept of abstract numbers — the idea of a oneness, a twoness, a threeness that applies to any class of objects and is a prerequisite for doing anything more mathematically demanding than setting a table — is itself far from innate.The word “illuminated” is closest in meaning to
check_box clarified
illustrated
lighted
accepted
Read the text and answer the question.People appear to be born to compute. The numerical skills of children develop so early and so inexorably that it is easy to imagine an internal clock of mathematical maturity guiding their growth. Not long after learning to walk and talk, they can set the table with impressive accuracy — one plate, oneknife, one spoon, one fork, for each of the five chairs. Soon they are capable of noting that theyhave placed five knives, spoons, and forks on the table and, a bit later, that this amounts to fifteen pieces of silverware. Having thus mastered addition, they move on to subtraction. It seems almost reasonable to expect that if a child were secluded on a desert island at birth and retrieved seven years later, he or she could enter a second-grade mathematics class without any serious problems of intellectual adjustment.Of course, the truth is not so simple. This century, the work of cognitive psychologists has illuminated the subtle forms of daily learning on which intellectual progress depends. Children were observed as they slowly grasped — or, as the case might be, bumped into — concepts that adults take for granted, as they refused, for instance, to concede that quantity is unchanged as water pours from a short stout glass into a tall thin one. Psychologists have since demonstrated that young children, asked to count the pencils in a pile, readily report the number of blue or red pencils, but must be coaxed into finding the total. Such studies have suggested that the rudiments of mathematics are mastered gradually, and with effort. They have also suggested that the very concept of abstract numbers — the idea of a oneness, a twoness, a threeness that applies to any class of objects and is a prerequisite for doing anything more mathematically demanding than setting a table — is itself far from innate.The word “They” refers to
check_box studies
mathematicians
children
pencils
Read the text and answer the question.People appear to be born to compute. The numerical skills of children develop so early and so inexorably that it is easy to imagine an internal clock of mathematical maturity guiding their growth. Not long after learning to walk and talk, they can set the table with impressive accuracy — one plate, oneknife, one spoon, one fork, for each of the five chairs. Soon they are capable of noting that theyhave placed five knives, spoons, and forks on the table and, a bit later, that this amounts to fifteen pieces of silverware. Having thus mastered addition, they move on to subtraction. It seems almost reasonable to expect that if a child were secluded on a desert island at birth and retrieved seven years later, he or she could enter a second-grade mathematics class without any serious problems of intellectual adjustment.Of course, the truth is not so simple. This century, the work of cognitive psychologists has illuminated the subtle forms of daily learning on which intellectual progress depends. Children were observed as they slowly grasped — or, as the case might be, bumped into — concepts that adults take for granted, as they refused, for instance, to concede that quantity is unchanged as water pours from a short stout glass into a tall thin one. Psychologists have since demonstrated that young children, asked to count the pencils in a pile, readily report the number of blue or red pencils, but must be coaxed into finding the total. Such studies have suggested that the rudiments of mathematics are mastered gradually, and with effort. They have also suggested that the very concept of abstract numbers — the idea of a oneness, a twoness, a threeness that applies to any class of objects and is a prerequisite for doing anything more mathematically demanding than setting a table — is itself far from innate.What does the passage mainly discuss?
check_box The development of mathematicalability in children
The use of mathematics in child psychology
Trends in teaching mathematics tochildren
The fundamental concepts ofmathematics that childrenmust learn
Read the text and answer the question.People appear to be born to compute. The numerical skills of children develop so early and so inexorably that it is easy to imagine an internal clock of mathematical maturity guiding their growth. Not long after learning to walk and talk, they can set the table with impressive accuracy — one plate, oneknife, one spoon, one fork, for each of the five chairs. Soon they are capable of noting that theyhave placed five knives, spoons, and forks on the table and, a bit later, that this amounts to fifteen pieces of silverware. Having thus mastered addition, they move on to subtraction. It seems almost reasonable to expect that if a child were secluded on a desert island at birth and retrieved seven years later, he or she could enter a second-grade mathematics class without any serious problems of intellectual adjustment.Of course, the truth is not so simple. This century, the work of cognitive psychologists has illuminated the subtle forms of daily learning on which intellectual progress depends. Children were observed as they slowly grasped — or, as the case might be, bumped into — concepts that adults take for granted, as they refused, for instance, to concede that quantity is unchanged as water pours from a short stout glass into a tall thin one. Psychologists have since demonstrated that young children, asked to count the pencils in a pile, readily report the number of blue or red pencils, but must be coaxed into finding the total. Such studies have suggested that the rudiments of mathematics are mastered gradually, and with effort. They have also suggested that the very concept of abstract numbers — the idea of a oneness, a twoness, a threeness that applies to any class of objects and is a prerequisite for doing anything more mathematically demanding than setting a table — is itself far from innate.With which of the following statements would the author be LEAST likely to agree?
check_box Children naturally and easily learn mathematics.
Most people follow the same pattern of mathematical development.
Mathematical development is subtle and gradual.
Children learn to add before theyleam to subtract.
Read the text and answer the question.This frightening scenario is in part the consequence of a dramatic increase over the last quarter century in the development of once natural areas of wet marshland; home not only to frogs but to all manner of wildlife. Yet, there are no obvious reasons why certain frog species are disappearing from rainforests in the Southern Hemisphere which are barely touched by human hand. The mystery is unsett1ing to say the least, for it is known that amphibian species are extremely sensitive to environmental variations in temperature and moisture levels. The danger is that planet Earth might not only lose a vital link in the ecological food chain (frogs keep populations of otherwise pestilent insects at manageable levels), but we might be increasing our output of air pollutants to levels that may have already become irreversible. Frogs could be inadvertently warning us of a catastrophe.What is best heading for the paragraph?
Frogs declining in number.
The mystery of amphibian decline.
Frogs making changes to the ecosystem.
Multi-coloured frog species cause problems
Read the text and answer the question.When was the last time you saw a frog? Chances are, if you live in a city, you have not seen one for some time. Even in wet areas once teeming with frogs and toads, it is becoming less and less easy to find those slimy, hopping and sometimes poisonous members of the animal kingdom. All over the world, even in remote jungles on the far side of the globe, frogs are losing the ecological battle for survival, and biologists are at a loss to explain their demise. Are amphibians simply over-sensitive to changes in the ecosystem? Could their rapid decline in numbers be signalling some coming environmental disaster for us all?To what does the pronoun one in the passage refer?
a jungle
a toad
disaster
a frog
Read the text and answer the question.When was the last time you saw a frog? Chances are, if you live in a city, you have not seen one for some time. Even in wet areas once teeming with frogs and toads, it is becoming less and less easy to find those slimy, hopping and sometimes poisonous members of the animal kingdom. All over the world, even in remote jungles on the far side of the globe, frogs are losing the ecological battle for survival, and biologists are at a loss to explain their demise. Are amphibians simply over-sensitive to changes in the ecosystem? Could their rapid decline in numbers be signalling some coming environmental disaster for us all?What does the pronoun their in the passage refer?
biologists
amphibians
members of the animal kingdom
toads
Read the text and answer the question.When was the last time you saw a frog? Chances are, if you live in a city, you have not seen one for some time. Even in wet areas once teeming with frogs and toads, it is becoming less and less easy to find those slimy, hopping and sometimes poisonous members of the animal kingdom. All over the world, even in remote jungles on the far side of the globe, frogs are losing the ecological battle for survival, and biologists are at a loss to explain their demise. Are amphibians simply over-sensitive to changes in the ecosystem? Could their rapid decline in numbers be signalling some coming environmental disaster for us all?What is best heading for the paragraph?
Multi-coloured frog species cause problems
The mystery of amphibian decline.
Frogs declining in number.
Frogs making changes to the ecosystem.
Read the text and choose the best answer to complete the gap.In the 17th century, became a constitutional monarchy. King Charles I signed an agreement. He had to go through the English Parliament to exact new taxes and laws or to start wars. Immediately after signing the agreement, the king ignored it. He tried to rule with absolute power. He was beheaded for treason. The new era of constitutional monarchy had begun. The Russian Empire was an absolute monarchy in . The first ruler was Peter I. He was a member of the Romanov family. He became tsar in 1682. "Tsar" is the Russian word for "emperor." The Romanov family ruled this empire until the February Revolution of 1917. In this year, the Russian people revolted. The reigning tsar, Nicholas II was forced to give up his throne. By 1918, Nicholas II and his family were shot before a firing squad. Types of Monarchy
check_box Absolute
Symbolic
Empire
Constitutional Monarchy
Read the text and choose the best answer to complete the gap.Monarchy in EuropeA monarchy is a form of government where a single ruler is the head of state. It is one of the oldest forms of government in the world. Monarchs are usually kings or queens. But they can also be a chief, an emperor, or called by another name. In some countries, such as Japan, the monarch is merely symbolic. They are figureheads with no real power. In other countries, the monarch wields considerable power. There are currently 29 sovereign monarchies around the world. Hereditary monarchy is the most common style of succession. This form is used by most of the world's monarchies. In this case, all of the kings and queens come from the same family. A family that rules for a span of time is called a dynasty. The crown is passed down from one member to another member of the family. The hereditary system has the advantages of stability, continuity, and predictability. Family affection and loyalty are also stabilizing factors. Types of Monarchy
Absolute
Constitutional Monarchy
Empire
Symbolic
Read the text and choose the best answer to complete the gap.Over the centuries, most European countries were ruled by monarchs. The , , and still have constitutional monarchies. In a constitutional monarchy a king or queen reigns but must obey the constitutional laws of the nation. This form of government severely limits the monarch's power. In the 17th century, became a constitutional monarchy. King Charles I signed an agreement. He had to go through the English Parliament to exact new taxes and laws or to start wars. Immediately after signing the agreement, the king ignored it. He tried to rule with absolute power. He was beheaded for treason. The new era of constitutional monarchy had begun. Types of Monarchy
check_box Constitutional Monarchy
Symbolic
Absolute
Empire
Read the text and choose the best answer. Many young people from disadvantaged social classes join gangs. Gangs are groups of individuals who share a common identity. Some anthropologists believe the gang structure is one of the most ancient forms of human organization. Gangs are often associated with criminal activities. Street gangs tend to be populated with young people from low income or impoverished homes. In contrast, organized crime gangs such as the Italian-American Mafia usually occupy the middle or upper class stratum of society. Gangs usually take over a territory in a city or suburb. They call this territory their "turf." One common criminal activity on their turf is "providing protection." This is a common style of extortion in which a gang provides protection from its own members for money. Since the 1970s, many gangs have been associated with selling drugs. The most problematic substance associated with gangs is crack cocaine. They are also known to commit burglaries, car theft, and armed robberies. Individual members of gangs are usually referred to as gangsters. These members frequently join in their teens. This is often the result of early exposure to drugs and violence. Low-income housing projects and poor neighborhoods are ideal locations for gangs to exist and thrive. Sometimes, new recruits for a gang are "jumped in." This is when the other gang members beat up the new recruit to test their dedication and loyalty. Recruits must also sometimes commit a crime such as robbery, rape, or murder to gain entry. Once in a gang, there are only two ways for a member to quit. One way is for the member to die. The other way is for the member to desert the gang. The deserting of a gang usually gains the deserter a death sentence from the other gang members. Members of gangs have a very short life expectancy. Because of this lifestyle, morality is often ignored. Criminal acts of violence are not a taboo. In fact, violence is often seen as a way to gain honor and prestige within the gang. According to the passage, all of the following are mentioned as illegal activities connected with gangs EXCEPT:
lending money
selling drugs
killing people
stealing cars
Read the text and choose the best answer. Many young people from disadvantaged social classes join gangs. Gangs are groups of individuals who share a common identity. Some anthropologists believe the gang structure is one of the most ancient forms of human organization. Gangs are often associated with criminal activities. Street gangs tend to be populated with young people from low income or impoverished homes. In contrast, organized crime gangs such as the Italian-American Mafia usually occupy the middle or upper class stratum of society. Gangs usually take over a territory in a city or suburb. They call this territory their "turf." One common criminal activity on their turf is "providing protection." This is a common style of extortion in which a gang provides protection from its own members for money. Since the 1970s, many gangs have been associated with selling drugs. The most problematic substance associated with gangs is crack cocaine. They are also known to commit burglaries, car theft, and armed robberies. Individual members of gangs are usually referred to as gangsters. These members frequently join in their teens. This is often the result of early exposure to drugs and violence. Low-income housing projects and poor neighborhoods are ideal locations for gangs to exist and thrive. Sometimes, new recruits for a gang are "jumped in." This is when the other gang members beat up the new recruit to test their dedication and loyalty. Recruits must also sometimes commit a crime such as robbery, rape, or murder to gain entry. Once in a gang, there are only two ways for a member to quit. One way is for the member to die. The other way is for the member to desert the gang. The deserting of a gang usually gains the deserter a death sentence from the other gang members. Members of gangs have a very short life expectancy. Because of this lifestyle, morality is often ignored. Criminal acts of violence are not a taboo. In fact, violence is often seen as a way to gain honor and prestige within the gang. According to the passage, how can a person stop being a gang member?
check_box Leave the gang
Fight against other members
Recruit a new members
Steal money
Read the text and choose the best answer. Many young people from disadvantaged social classes join gangs. Gangs are groups of individuals who share a common identity. Some anthropologists believe the gang structure is one of the most ancient forms of human organization. Gangs are often associated with criminal activities. Street gangs tend to be populated with young people from low income or impoverished homes. In contrast, organized crime gangs such as the Italian-American Mafia usually occupy the middle or upper class stratum of society. Gangs usually take over a territory in a city or suburb. They call this territory their "turf." One common criminal activity on their turf is "providing protection." This is a common style of extortion in which a gang provides protection from its own members for money. What do groups of gangs share?
check_box a common identity
money
a territory
low income
Read the text and choose the best answer. Many young people from disadvantaged social classes join gangs. Gangs are groups of individuals who share a common identity. Some anthropologists believe the gang structure is one of the most ancient forms of human organization. Gangs are often associated with criminal activities. Street gangs tend to be populated with young people from low income or impoverished homes. In contrast, organized crime gangs such as the Italian-American Mafia usually occupy the middle or upper class stratum of society. Gangs usually take over a territory in a city or suburb. They call this territory their "turf." One common criminal activity on their turf is "providing protection." This is a common style of extortion in which a gang provides protection from its own members for money. Who are members of street gangs?
anthropologists
young people
old people
young people from low income or impoverished homes
Read the text and choose the best answer.Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future. The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required.Anyone can set up a site; promoting your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself, is what the Web and the Internet is all about. And what is more, information on the Internet is not owned or controlled by anyone organisation. It is, perhaps, true to say that no-one and therefore everyone owns the 'Net'. Because of the relative freedom of access to information, the Internet has often been criticised by the media as a potentially hazardous tool in the hands of young computer users. This perception has proved to be largely false however, and the vast majority of users both young and old get connected with the Internet for the dual purposes for which it was intended – discovery and delight.What would the next paragraph to follow the passage probably be about?
The cost of using the Internet
Abuse of the Internet by youth
Advertising on the World Wide Web
The future of the Internet
Read the text and choose the best answer.Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future. The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required.Anyone can set up a site; promoting your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself, is what the Web and the Internet is all about. And what is more, information on the Internet is not owned or controlled by anyone organisation. It is, perhaps, true to say that no-one and therefore everyone owns the 'Net'. Because of the relative freedom of access to information, the Internet has often been criticised by the media as a potentially hazardous tool in the hands of young computer users. This perception has proved to be largely false however, and the vast majority of users both young and old get connected with the Internet for the dual purposes for which it was intended – discovery and delight.Which is the best title for the passage ?
How to Use the Internet
The World Wide Web
The Internet Revolution
The Educational Hope of the Future
Read the text and choose the best answer.Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future.To what do the following pronoun "it" in the passage refer?
check_box The Information Superhighway
computer
Internet address or site
visual telephone link
Read the text and choose the best answer.Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future.What is the main point of the paragraph?
Almost everyone has heard of the Information Superhighway.
The Internet will revolutionise the way people communicate.
You need a modem and an address to use the Internet.
No-one knows where the Information Superhighway is headed.
Read the text and choose the best answer.As many as one thousand years ago in the Southwest, the Hopi and Zuni Indians of North America were building with adobe — sun-baked brick plastered with mud. Their homes looked remarkably like modem apartment houses. Some were four stories high and contained quarters for perhaps a thousand people, along with storerooms for grain and other goods. These buildings were usually put up against cliffs, both to make construction easier and for defense against enemies. They were really villages in themselves, as later Spanish explorers must have realized since they called them “pueblos,” which is Spanish for towns.The people of the pueblos raised what are called “the three sisters” — corns, beans, and squash. They made excellent pottery and wove marvelous baskets, some so fine that they could hold water. The Southwest has always been a dry country, where water is scarce. The Hopi and Zuni brought water from streams to their fields and gardens through irrigation ditches. Water was so important that it played a major role in their religion. They developed elaborate ceremonies and religious rituals to bring rain....The word “scarce” is closest in meaning to
pure
hidden
necessary
limited
Read the text and choose the best answer.As many as one thousand years ago in the Southwest, the Hopi and Zuni Indians of North America were building with adobe — sun-baked brick plastered with mud. Their homes looked remarkably like modem apartment houses. Some were four stories high and contained quarters for perhaps a thousand people, along with storerooms for grain and other goods. These buildings were usually put up against cliffs, both to make construction easier and for defense against enemies. They were really villages in themselves, as later Spanish explorers must have realized since they called them “pueblos,” which is Spanish for towns.The people of the pueblos raised what are called “the three sisters” — corns, beans, and squash. They made excellent pottery and wove marvelous baskets, some so fine that they could hold water. The Southwest has always been a dry country, where water is scarce. The Hopi and Zuni brought water from streams to their fields and gardens through irrigation ditches. Water was so important that it played a major role in their religion. They developed elaborate ceremonies and religious rituals to bring rain.According to the passage, the Hopi and Zuni typically built their homes
in valleys
on open plains
against cliffs
next to streams
Read the text and choose the best answer.As many as one thousand years ago in the Southwest, the Hopi and Zuni Indians of North America were building with adobe — sun-baked brick plastered with mud. Their homes looked remarkably like modem apartment houses. Some were four stories high and contained quarters for perhaps a thousand people, along with storerooms for grain and other goods. These buildings were usually put up against cliffs, both to make construction easier and for defense against enemies. They were really villages in themselves, as later Spanish explorers must have realized since they called them “pueblos,” which is Spanish for towns.The people of the pueblos raised what are called “the three sisters” — corns, beans, and squash. They made excellent pottery and wove marvelous baskets, some so fine that they could hold water. The Southwest has always been a dry country, where water is scarce. The Hopi and Zuni brought water from streams to their fields and gardens through irrigation ditches. Water was so important that it played a major role in their religion. They developed elaborate ceremonies and religious rituals to bring rain.It can be inferred from the passage that the dwellings of the Hopi and Zuni were....
quickly constructed
difficult to defend
highly advanced
very small
Read the text and choose the best answer.As many as one thousand years ago in the Southwest, the Hopi and Zuni Indians of North America were building with adobe — sun-baked brick plastered with mud. Their homes looked remarkably like modem apartment houses. Some were four stories high and contained quarters for perhaps a thousand people, along with storerooms for grain and other goods. These buildings were usually put up against cliffs, both to make construction easier and for defense against enemies. They were really villages in themselves, as later Spanish explorers must have realized since they called them “pueblos,” which is Spanish for towns.The people of the pueblos raised what are called “the three sisters” — corns, beans, and squash. They made excellent pottery and wove marvelous baskets, some so fine that they could hold water. The Southwest has always been a dry country, where water is scarce. The Hopi and Zuni brought water from streams to their fields and gardens through irrigation ditches. Water was so important that it played a major role in their religion. They developed elaborate ceremonies and religious rituals to bring rain.The author uses the phrase “the three sisters” to refer to
check_box important crops
family members
Hopi women
rain ceremonies
Read the text and choose the best answer.As many as one thousand years ago in the Southwest, the Hopi and Zuni Indians of North America were building with adobe — sun-baked brick plastered with mud. Their homes looked remarkably like modem apartment houses. Some were four stories high and contained quarters for perhaps a thousand people, along with storerooms for grain and other goods. These buildings were usually put up against cliffs, both to make construction easier and for defense against enemies. They were really villages in themselves, as later Spanish explorers must have realized since they called them “pueblos,” which is Spanish for towns.The people of the pueblos raised what are called “the three sisters” — corns, beans, and squash. They made excellent pottery and wove marvelous baskets, some so fine that they could hold water. The Southwest has always been a dry country, where water is scarce. The Hopi and Zuni brought water from streams to their fields and gardens through irrigation ditches. Water was so important that it played a major role in their religion. They developed elaborate ceremonies and religious rituals to bring rain.The way of life of less-settled groups was simpler and more strongly influenced by nature. Small tribes such as the Shoshone and Ute wandered the dry and mountainous lands between the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. They gathered seeds and hunted small animals such as rabbits and snakes. In the Far North the ancestors of today’s Inuit hunted seals, walnises, and the great whales. They lived right on the frozen seas in shelters called igloos built of blocks of packed snow. When summer came, they fished for salmon and hunted the lordly caribou.The Cheyenne, Pawnee, and Sioux tribes, known as the Plains Indians, lived on the grasslands between the Rocky Mountains and the Mississippi River. They hunted bison, commonly called the buffalo. Its meat was the chief food of these tribes, and its hide was used to make their clothing and the covering of their tents and tipis.According to the passage, which of the following tribes lived in the grasslands?
check_box The Cheyenne and Sioux
The Shoshone and Ute
The Pawnee and Inuit
The Hopi and Zuni
Read the text and choose the best answer.As many as one thousand years ago in the Southwest, the Hopi and Zuni Indians of North America were building with adobe — sun-baked brick plastered with mud. Their homes looked remarkably like modem apartment houses. Some were four stories high and contained quarters for perhaps a thousand people, along with storerooms for grain and other goods. These buildings were usually put up against cliffs, both to make construction easier and for defense against enemies. They were really villages in themselves, as later Spanish explorers must have realized since they called them “pueblos,” which is Spanish for towns.The people of the pueblos raised what are called “the three sisters” — corns, beans, and squash. They made excellent pottery and wove marvelous baskets, some so fine that they could hold water. The Southwest has always been a dry country, where water is scarce. The Hopi and Zuni brought water from streams to their fields and gardens through irrigation ditches. Water was so important that it played a major role in their religion. They developed elaborate ceremonies and religious rituals to bring rain.The way of life of less-settled groups was simpler and more strongly influenced by nature. Small tribes such as the Shoshone and Ute wandered the dry and mountainous lands between the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. They gathered seeds and hunted small animals such as rabbits and snakes. In the Far North the ancestors of today’s Inuit hunted seals, walnises, and the great whales. They lived right on the frozen seas in shelters called igloos built of blocks of packed snow. When summer came, they fished for salmon and hunted the lordly caribou.The Cheyenne, Pawnee, and Sioux tribes, known as the Plains Indians, lived on the grasslands between the Rocky Mountains and the Mississippi River. They hunted bison, commonly called the buffalo. Its meat was the chief food of these tribes, and its hide was used to make their clothing and the covering of their tents and tipis.The author gives an explanation for all of the following words EXCEPT
caribou
pueblos
adobe
bison
Read the text and choose the best answer.As many as one thousand years ago in the Southwest, the Hopi and Zuni Indians of North America were building with adobe — sun-baked brick plastered with mud. Their homes looked remarkably like modem apartment houses. Some were four stories high and contained quarters for perhaps a thousand people, along with storerooms for grain and other goods. These buildings were usually put up against cliffs, both to make construction easier and for defense against enemies. They were really villages in themselves, as later Spanish explorers must have realized since they called them “pueblos,” which is Spanish for towns.The people of the pueblos raised what are called “the three sisters” — corns, beans, and squash. They made excellent pottery and wove marvelous baskets, some so fine that they could hold water. The Southwest has always been a dry country, where water is scarce. The Hopi and Zuni brought water from streams to their fields and gardens through irrigation ditches. Water was so important that it played a major role in their religion. They developed elaborate ceremonies and religious rituals to bring rain.The way of life of less-settled groups was simpler and more strongly influenced by nature. Small tribes such as the Shoshone and Ute wandered the dry and mountainous lands between the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. They gathered seeds and hunted small animals such as rabbits and snakes. In the Far North the ancestors of today’s Inuit hunted seals, walnises, and the great whales. They lived right on the frozen seas in shelters called igloos built of blocks of packed snow. When summer came, they fished for salmon and hunted the lordly caribou.The Cheyenne, Pawnee, and Sioux tribes, known as the Plains Indians, lived on the grasslands between the Rocky Mountains and the Mississippi River. They hunted bison, commonly called the buffalo. Its meat was the chief food of these tribes, and its hide was used to make their clothing and the covering of their tents and tipis.The author groups North American Indians according to their
check_box tribes and geographical regions
arts and crafts
date of appearance on the continent
rituals and ceremonies
Read the text and choose the best answer.As many as one thousand years ago in the Southwest, the Hopi and Zuni Indians of North America were building with adobe — sun-baked brick plastered with mud. Their homes looked remarkably like modem apartment houses. Some were four stories high and contained quarters for perhaps a thousand people, along with storerooms for grain and other goods. These buildings were usually put up against cliffs, both to make construction easier and for defense against enemies. They were really villages in themselves, as later Spanish explorers must have realized since they called them “pueblos,” which is Spanish for towns.The people of the pueblos raised what are called “the three sisters” — corns, beans, and squash. They made excellent pottery and wove marvelous baskets, some so fine that they could hold water. The Southwest has always been a dry country, where water is scarce. The Hopi and Zuni brought water from streams to their fields and gardens through irrigation ditches. Water was so important that it played a major role in their religion. They developed elaborate ceremonies and religious rituals to bring rain.The way of life of less-settled groups was simpler and more strongly influenced by nature. Small tribes such as the Shoshone and Ute wandered the dry and mountainous lands between the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. They gathered seeds and hunted small animals such as rabbits and snakes. In the Far North the ancestors of today’s Inuit hunted seals, walnises, and the great whales. They lived right on the frozen seas in shelters called igloos built of blocks of packed snow. When summer came, they fished for salmon and hunted the lordly caribou.The Cheyenne, Pawnee, and Sioux tribes, known as the Plains Indians, lived on the grasslands between the Rocky Mountains and the Mississippi River. They hunted bison, commonly called the buffalo. Its meat was the chief food of these tribes, and its hide was used to make their clothing and the covering of their tents and tipis.What does the passage mainly discuss?
The movement of American Indians across North America
Ceremonies and rituals of American Indians
The way of life of American Indian tribes in early North America
The architecture of early American Indian buildings
Read the text and choose the best answer.As many as one thousand years ago in the Southwest, the Hopi and Zuni Indians of North America were building with adobe — sun-baked brick plastered with mud. Their homes looked remarkably like modem apartment houses. Some were four stories high and contained quarters for perhaps a thousand people, along with storerooms for grain and other goods. These buildings were usually put up against cliffs, both to make construction easier and for defense against enemies. They were really villages in themselves, as later Spanish explorers must have realized since they called them “pueblos,” which is Spanish for towns.The people of the pueblos raised what are called “the three sisters” — corns, beans, and squash. They made excellent pottery and wove marvelous baskets, some so fine that they could hold water. The Southwest has always been a dry country, where water is scarce. The Hopi and Zuni brought water from streams to their fields and gardens through irrigation ditches. Water was so important that it played a major role in their religion. They developed elaborate ceremonies and religious rituals to bring rain.The way of life of less-settled groups was simpler and more strongly influenced by nature. Small tribes such as the Shoshone and Ute wandered the dry and mountainous lands between the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. They gathered seeds and hunted small animals such as rabbits and snakes. In the Far North the ancestors of today’s Inuit hunted seals, walnises, and the great whales. They lived right on the frozen seas in shelters called igloos built of blocks of packed snow. When summer came, they fished for salmon and hunted the lordly caribou.The Cheyenne, Pawnee, and Sioux tribes, known as the Plains Indians, lived on the grasslands between the Rocky Mountains and the Mississippi River. They hunted bison, commonly called the buffalo. Its meat was the chief food of these tribes, and its hide was used to make their clothing and the covering of their tents and tipis.Which of the following animals was most important to the Plains Indians?
check_box The buffalo
The seal
The caribou
The salmon
Read the text and choose the best answer.As many as one thousand years ago in the Southwest, the Hopi and Zuni Indians of North America were building with adobe — sun-baked brick plastered with mud. Their homes looked remarkably like modem apartment houses. Some were four stories high and contained quarters for perhaps a thousand people, along with storerooms for grain and other goods. These buildings were usually put up against cliffs, both to make construction easier and for defense against enemies. They were really villages in themselves, as later Spanish explorers must have realized since they called them “pueblos,” which is Spanish for towns.The people of the pueblos raised what are called “the three sisters” — corns, beans, and squash. They made excellent pottery and wove marvelous baskets, some so fine that they could hold water. The Southwest has always been a dry country, where water is scarce. The Hopi and Zuni brought water from streams to their fields and gardens through irrigation ditches. Water was so important that it played a major role in their religion. They developed elaborate ceremonies and religious rituals to bring rain.The way of life of less-settled groups was simpler and more strongly influenced by nature. Small tribes such as the Shoshone and Ute wandered the dry and mountainous lands between the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. They gathered seeds and hunted small animals such as rabbits and snakes. In the Far North the ancestors of today’s Inuit hunted seals, walnises, and the great whales. They lived right on the frozen seas in shelters called igloos built of blocks of packed snow. When summer came, they fished for salmon and hunted the lordly caribou.The Cheyenne, Pawnee, and Sioux tribes, known as the Plains Indians, lived on the grasslands between the Rocky Mountains and the Mississippi River. They hunted bison, commonly called the buffalo. Its meat was the chief food of these tribes, and its hide was used to make their clothing and the covering of their tents and tipis.Which of the following is NOT mentioned by the author as a dwelling place of early North Americans?
Igloos
Adobe houses
Tipis
Log cabins
Read the text and choose the best answer.As many as one thousand years ago in the Southwest, the Hopi and Zuni Indians of North America were building with adobe — sun-baked brick plastered with mud. Their homes looked remarkably like modem apartment houses. Some were four stories high and contained quarters for perhaps a thousand people, along with storerooms for grain and other goods. These buildings were usually put up against cliffs, both to make construction easier and for defense against enemies. They were really villages in themselves, as later Spanish explorers must have realized since they called them “pueblos,” which is Spanish for towns.The people of the pueblos raised what are called “the three sisters” — corns, beans, and squash. They made excellent pottery and wove marvelous baskets, some so fine that they could hold water. The Southwest has always been a dry country, where water is scarce. The Hopi and Zuni brought water from streams to their fields and gardens through irrigation ditches. Water was so important that it played a major role in their religion. They developed elaborate ceremonies and religious rituals to bring rain.The way of life of less-settled groups was simpler and more strongly influenced by nature. Small tribes such as the Shoshone and Ute wandered the dry and mountainous lands between the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. They gathered seeds and hunted small animals such as rabbits and snakes. In the Far North the ancestors of today’s Inuit hunted seals, walnises, and the great whales. They lived right on the frozen seas in shelters called igloos built of blocks of packed snow. When summer came, they fished for salmon and hunted the lordly caribou.The Cheyenne, Pawnee, and Sioux tribes, known as the Plains Indians, lived on the grasslands between the Rocky Mountains and the Mississippi River. They hunted bison, commonly called the buffalo. Its meat was the chief food of these tribes, and its hide was used to make their clothing and the covering of their tents and tipis.Which of the following is true of the Shoshone and Ute?
They hunted caribou.
They built their homes with adobe.
They were not as settled as the Hopi and Zuni.
They did not have many religious ceremonies.
Read the text and choose the best answer.In the 17th century, became a constitutional monarchy. King Charles I signed an agreement. He had to go through the English Parliament to exact new taxes and laws or to start wars. Immediately after signing the agreement, the king ignored it. He tried to rule with absolute power. He was beheaded for treason. The new era of constitutional monarchy had begun. According to the paragraph , all of the following are true about King Charles I EXCEPT:
He was beheaded for treason.
He tried to rule with absolute power.
He was loved by the people he ruled over.
He signed an agreement that limited his power.
Read the text and choose the best answer.In the 17th century, became a constitutional monarchy. King Charles I signed an agreement. He had to go through the English Parliament to exact new taxes and laws or to start wars. Immediately after signing the agreement, the king ignored it. He tried to rule with absolute power. He was beheaded for treason. The new era of constitutional monarchy had begun. The word exact is closet in meaning to
raise
correct
approve of
demand
Read the text and choose the best answer.In the 1940's and 1950's, biochemists strived to learn why each of the vitamins was essential for health. They discovered that key enzymes in metabolism depend on one or another of the vitamins as coenzymes to perform the chemistry that provides cells with energy for growth and function. Now, these enzyme hunters occupied center stage. The word "strived" is closest in meaning to
check_box tried
experimented
failed
studied
Read the text and choose the best answer.In the country of , there is a wall that is 1,500 miles long. It is called the Great Wall of China .It winds uphill and down, through valleys and mountains. Every inch of this 1,500- mile wall was made by hand. The is made many, many years ago. The people of made it to keep out their enemies. There are watch towers all along the way. The Wall is made of brick and earth. It is high and wide on top. People can walk along the top as if it were a road .It is said that it took ten years to build one part of this wall. No other defense line has ever been made as long as the .It is said that it took 10 years to build one part of this wall.
True
Not Given
False
Read the text and choose the best answer.In the country of , there is a wall that is 1,500 miles long. It is called the Great Wall of China .It winds uphill and down, through valleys and mountains. Every inch of this 1,500- mile wall was made by hand. The is made many, many years ago. The people of made it to keep out their enemies. There are watch towers all along the way. The Wall is made of brick and earth. It is high and wide on top. People can walk along the top as if it were a road .It is said that it took ten years to build one part of this wall. No other defense line has ever been made as long as the .The Great Wall isn’t in China.
True
Not Given
False
Read the text and choose the best answer.In the country of , there is a wall that is 1,500 miles long. It is called the Great Wall of China .It winds uphill and down, through valleys and mountains. Every inch of this 1,500- mile wall was made by hand. The is made many, many years ago. The people of made it to keep out their enemies. There are watch towers all along the way. The Wall is made of brick and earth. It is high and wide on top. People can walk along the top as if it were a road .It is said that it took ten years to build one part of this wall. No other defense line has ever been made as long as the .The people of China made the wall to keep out their enemies.
check_box True
False
Not Given
Read the text and choose the best answer.In the mid-nineteenth century, the United States had tremendous natural resources that could be exploited in order to develop heavy industry. Most of the raw materials that are valuable in the manufacture of machinery, transportation facilities, and consumer goods lay ready to be worked into wealth. Iron, coal, and oil-the basic ingredients of industrial growth - were plentiful and needed only the application of technical expertise, organizational skill, and labor. One crucial development in this movement toward industrialization was the growth of the railroads. The railway network expanded rapidly until the railroad map of the United States looked like a spider's web, with the steel filaments connecting all important sources of raw materials, their places of manufacture, and their centers of distribution. The railroads contributed to the industrial growth not only by connecting these major centers, but also by themselves consuming enormous amounts of fuel, iron, and coal. Many factors influenced emerging modes of production. For example, machine tools, the tools used to make goods, were steadily improved in the latter part of the nineteenth century-always with an eye to speedier production and lower unit costs. The products of the factories were rapidly absorbed by the growing cities that sheltered the workers and the distributors. The increased urban population was nourished by the increased farm production that, in turn, was made more productive by the use of the new farm machinery. American agricultural production kept up with the urban demand and still had surpluses for sale to the industrial centers of Europe. The labor that ran the factories and built the railways was recruited in part from American farm areas where people were being displaced by farm machinery, in part from Asia, and in part from Europe. Europe now began to send tides of immigrants from eastern and southern Europe-most of whom were originally poor farmers but who settled in American industrial cities. The money to finance this tremendous expansion of the American economy still came from European financiers for the most part, but the Americans were approaching the day when their expansion could be financed in their own "money market." According to the passage, all of the following were true of railroads in the United States in the nineteenth century EXCEPT that
check_box they used relatively small quantities of natural resources
they were expanded in a short time
they connected important industrial cities
they were necessary to the industrialization process
Read the text and choose the best answer.In the mid-nineteenth century, the United States had tremendous natural resources that could be exploited in order to develop heavy industry. Most of the raw materials that are valuable in the manufacture of machinery, transportation facilities, and consumer goods lay ready to be worked into wealth. Iron, coal, and oil-the basic ingredients of industrial growth - were plentiful and needed only the application of technical expertise, organizational skill, and labor. One crucial development in this movement toward industrialization was the growth of the railroads. The railway network expanded rapidly until the railroad map of the United States looked like a spider's web, with the steel filaments connecting all important sources of raw materials, their places of manufacture, and their centers of distribution. The railroads contributed to the industrial growth not only by connecting these major centers, but also by themselves consuming enormous amounts of fuel, iron, and coal. Many factors influenced emerging modes of production. For example, machine tools, the tools used to make goods, were steadily improved in the latter part of the nineteenth century-always with an eye to speedier production and lower unit costs. The products of the factories were rapidly absorbed by the growing cities that sheltered the workers and the distributors. The increased urban population was nourished by the increased farm production that, in turn, was made more productive by the use of the new farm machinery. American agricultural production kept up with the urban demand and still had surpluses for sale to the industrial centers of Europe. The labor that ran the factories and built the railways was recruited in part from American farm areas where people were being displaced by farm machinery, in part from Asia, and in part from Europe. Europe now began to send tides of immigrants from eastern and southern Europe-most of whom were originally poor farmers but who settled in American industrial cities. The money to finance this tremendous expansion of the American economy still came from European financiers for the most part, but the Americans were approaching the day when their expansion could be financed in their own "money market." What does the passage mainly discuss?
The history of railroads in the United States
Factors that affected industrialization in the United States
The major United States industrial centers
The role of agriculture in the nineteenth century
Read the text and choose the best answer.In view of the inexorable progress in science, we can expect that the gene hunters will be replaced in the spotlight. When and by whom? Which kind of hunter will dominate the scene in the last decade of our waning century and in the early decades of the next? I wonder whether the hunters who will occupy the spotlight will be neurobiologists who apply the techniques of the enzyme and gene hunters to the functions of the brain. What to call them? The head hunters. I will return to them later. The author implies that the most important medical research topic of the future will be
check_box the functions of the brain
inherited diseases
the structure of gene
the operation of vitamins
Read the text and choose the best answer.In view of the inexorable progress in science, we can expect that the gene hunters will be replaced in the spotlight. When and by whom? Which kind of hunter will dominate the scene in the last decade of our waning century and in the early decades of the next? I wonder whether the hunters who will occupy the spotlight will be neurobiologists who apply the techniques of the enzyme and gene hunters to the functions of the brain. What to call them? The head hunters. I will return to them later. The phrase "occupy the spotlight" is closest in meaning to
go the furthest
receive the most attention
conquer territory
lighten the load
Read the text and choose the best answer.Many factors influenced emerging modes of production. For example, machine tools, the tools used to make goods, were steadily improved in the latter part of the nineteenth century-always with an eye to speedier production and lower unit costs. The products of the factories were rapidly absorbed by the growing cities that sheltered the workers and the distributors. The increased urban population was nourished by the increased farm production that, in turn, was made more productive by the use of the new farm machinery. American agricultural production kept up with the urban demand and still had surpluses for sale to the industrial centers of . The labor that ran the factories and built the railways was recruited in part from American farm areas where people were being displaced by farm machinery, in part from Asia, and in part from . now began to send tides of immigrants from eastern and southern Europe-most of whom were originally poor farmers but who settled in American industrial cities. The money to finance this tremendous expansion of the American economy still came from European financiers for the most part, but the Americans were approaching the day when their expansion could be financed in their own "money market." According to the passage, what did the United States supply to European cities?
Agricultural produce
Machine tools
Money
Raw materials
Read the text and choose the best answer.Many factors influenced emerging modes of production. For example, machine tools, the tools used to make goods, were steadily improved in the latter part of the nineteenth century-always with an eye to speedier production and lower unit costs. The products of the factories were rapidly absorbed by the growing cities that sheltered the workers and the distributors. The increased urban population was nourished by the increased farm production that, in turn, was made more productive by the use of the new farm machinery. American agricultural production kept up with the urban demand and still had surpluses for sale to the industrial centers of . The labor that ran the factories and built the railways was recruited in part from American farm areas where people were being displaced by farm machinery, in part from Asia, and in part from . now began to send tides of immigrants from eastern and southern Europe-most of whom were originally poor farmers but who settled in American industrial cities. The money to finance this tremendous expansion of the American economy still came from European financiers for the most part, but the Americans were approaching the day when their expansion could be financed in their own "money market." Which of the following is NOT true of United States farmers in the nineteenth century?
They sold food to European countries.
They were unable to produce sufficient food for urban areas.
They raises their productivity by using new machinery.
They lost some jobs because of mechanization.
Read the text and choose the best answer.Many factors influenced emerging modes of production. For example, machine tools, the tools used to make goods, were steadily improved in the latter part of the nineteenth century-always with an eye to speedier production and lower unit costs. The products of the factories were rapidly absorbed by the growing cities that sheltered the workers and the distributors. The increased urban population was nourished by the increased farm production that, in turn, was made more productive by the use of the new farm machinery. American agricultural production kept up with the urban demand and still had surpluses for sale to the industrial centers of . The word "nourished" is closest in meaning to
check_box fed
protected
paid
housed
Read the text and choose the best answer.Many factors influenced emerging modes of production. For example, machine tools, the tools used to make goods, were steadily improved in the latter part of the nineteenth century-always with an eye to speedier production and lower unit costs. The products of the factories were rapidly absorbed by the growing cities that sheltered the workers and the distributors. The increased urban population was nourished by the increased farm production that, in turn, was made more productive by the use of the new farm machinery. American agricultural production kept up with the urban demand and still had surpluses for sale to the industrial centers of Europe. According to the passage, what was one effect of the improvement of machine tools?
Lower manufacturing costs
Better distribution of goods
A reduction in industrial jobs
More efficient transportation of natural resources
Read the text and choose the best answer.One crucial development in this movement toward industrialization was the growth of the railroads. The railway network expanded rapidly until the railroad map of the looked like a spider's web, with the steel filaments connecting all important sources of raw materials, their places of manufacture, and their centers of distribution. The railroads contributed to the industrial growth not only by connecting these major centers, but also by themselves consuming enormous amounts of fuel, iron, and coal. Many factors influenced emerging modes of production. For example, machine tools, the tools used to make goods, were steadily improved in the latter part of the nineteenth century-always with an eye to speedier production and lower unit costs. The products of the factories were rapidly absorbed by the growing cities that sheltered the workers and the distributors. The increased urban population was nourished by the increased farm production that, in turn, was made more productive by the use of the new farm machinery. American agricultural production kept up with the urban demand and still had surpluses for sale to the industrial centers of . The labor that ran the factories and built the railways was recruited in part from American farm areas where people were being displaced by farm machinery, in part from Asia, and in part from . now began to send tides of immigrants from eastern and southern Europe-most of whom were originally poor farmers but who settled in American industrial cities. The money to finance this tremendous expansion of the American economy still came from European financiers for the most part, but the Americans were approaching the day when their expansion could be financed in their own "money market." According to the passage, who were the biggest consumers of manufactured products?
Farmers
Europeans
Railway workers
City dwellers
Read the text and choose the best answer.One crucial development in this movement toward industrialization was the growth of the railroads. The railway network expanded rapidly until the railroad map of the looked like a spider's web, with the steel filaments connecting all important sources of raw materials, their places of manufacture, and their centers of distribution. The railroads contributed to the industrial growth not only by connecting these major centers, but also by themselves consuming enormous amounts of fuel, iron, and coal. Why does the author mention "a spider's web"?
check_box To describe the complex structure of the railway system
To describe the difficulties involved in the distribution of raw materials
To explain the problems brought on by railway expansion
To emphasize the railroad's consumption of oil and coal
Read the text and choose the best answer.One of the most renowned Spanish architects of all time was Antoni Gaudi. Gaudi's emergence as one of 's preeminent artists at the end of the nineteenth century marked a milestone in the art world. Gaudi's popularity helped to bring about the acceptance and rebirth of the Catalan language, which had been banned during the literature and art. Gaudi shares his Catalonian background with two other famous Spanish artists, Pablo Picasso and Miro. The diverse ethnic background of the region greatly influenced the work of Picasso and Miro, as well as Gaudi. Thus, their works were a combination of an old history and an active, vivid imaginary world. This has sometimes been referred to as the “Catalan Mind.” Yet it was perhaps Gaudi who had the greatest talent for bringing together diverse groups, ones which others viewed as being too diametrically opposed to be capable of coming together and co-existing amicably. This was apparent not only in the artists and other individuals who surrounded him, but also in the varied styles and techniques he employed in his architecture. Much of his work can be seen in , where his structures are known as a fine representation of modernism. He also used a great variety of color in his buildings, and this art nouveau is often associated with his own unique style of design. All of these factors are what helped put him at the forefront of art movements to come: his unique ability to take on and transform traditional Spanish elements with the emerging diverse ethnic groups, merging these with his own fertile imagination, and consequently turning these forces into some of the greatest architecture the world has ever seen. Antoni Gaudi’s fame is due primarily to his world famous
check_box architectural structures
political skills
business acumen
paintings
Read the text and choose the best answer.One of the most renowned Spanish architects of all time was Antoni Gaudi. Gaudi's emergence as one of 's preeminent artists at the end of the nineteenth century marked a milestone in the art world. Gaudi's popularity helped to bring about the acceptance and rebirth of the Catalan language, which had been banned during the literature and art. Gaudi shares his Catalonian background with two other famous Spanish artists, Pablo Picasso and Miro. The diverse ethnic background of the region greatly influenced the work of Picasso and Miro, as well as Gaudi. Thus, their works were a combination of an old history and an active, vivid imaginary world. This has sometimes been referred to as the “Catalan Mind.” Yet it was perhaps Gaudi who had the greatest talent for bringing together diverse groups, ones which others viewed as being too diametrically opposed to be capable of coming together and co-existing amicably. This was apparent not only in the artists and other individuals who surrounded him, but also in the varied styles and techniques he employed in his architecture. Much of his work can be seen in , where his structures are known as a fine representation of modernism. He also used a great variety of color in his buildings, and this art nouveau is often associated with his own unique style of design. All of these factors are what helped put him at the forefront of art movements to come: his unique ability to take on and transform traditional Spanish elements with the emerging diverse ethnic groups, merging these with his own fertile imagination, and consequently turning these forces into some of the greatest architecture the world has ever seen. Gaudi’s first language was....
check_box Catalan
Portuguese
Spanish
Castilian
Read the text and choose the best answer.One of the most renowned Spanish architects of all time was Antoni Gaudi. Gaudi's emergence as one of 's preeminent artists at the end of the nineteenth century marked a milestone in the art world. Gaudi's popularity helped to bring about the acceptance and rebirth of the Catalan language, which had been banned during the literature and art. Gaudi shares his Catalonian background with two other famous Spanish artists, Pablo Picasso and Miro. The diverse ethnic background of the region greatly influenced the work of Picasso and Miro, as well as Gaudi. Thus, their works were a combination of an old history and an active, vivid imaginary world. This has sometimes been referred to as the “Catalan Mind.” Yet it was perhaps Gaudi who had the greatest talent for bringing together diverse groups, ones which others viewed as being too diametrically opposed to be capable of coming together and co-existing amicably. This was apparent not only in the artists and other individuals who surrounded him, but also in the varied styles and techniques he employed in his architecture. Much of his work can be seen in , where his structures are known as a fine representation of modernism. He also used a great variety of color in his buildings, and this art nouveau is often associated with his own unique style of design. All of these factors are what helped put him at the forefront of art movements to come: his unique ability to take on and transform traditional Spanish elements with the emerging diverse ethnic groups, merging these with his own fertile imagination, and consequently turning these forces into some of the greatest architecture the world has ever seen. His art nouveau is often related to
check_box his own unique style of design
the politician
the forefront of art movements
the unique artist
Read the text and choose the best answer.One of the most renowned Spanish architects of all time was Antoni Gaudi. Gaudi's emergence as one of 's preeminent artists at the end of the nineteenth century marked a milestone in the art world. Gaudi's popularity helped to bring about the acceptance and rebirth of the Catalan language, which had been banned during the literature and art. Gaudi shares his Catalonian background with two other famous Spanish artists, Pablo Picasso and Miro. The diverse ethnic background of the region greatly influenced the work of Picasso and Miro, as well as Gaudi. Thus, their works were a combination of an old history and an active, vivid imaginary world. This has sometimes been referred to as the “Catalan Mind.” Yet it was perhaps Gaudi who had the greatest talent for bringing together diverse groups, ones which others viewed as being too diametrically opposed to be capable of coming together and co-existing amicably. This was apparent not only in the artists and other individuals who surrounded him, but also in the varied styles and techniques he employed in his architecture. Much of his work can be seen in , where his structures are known as a fine representation of modernism. He also used a great variety of color in his buildings, and this art nouveau is often associated with his own unique style of design. All of these factors are what helped put him at the forefront of art movements to come: his unique ability to take on and transform traditional Spanish elements with the emerging diverse ethnic groups, merging these with his own fertile imagination, and consequently turning these forces into some of the greatest architecture the world has ever seen. Miro has been viewed as being a prototype of
check_box the Catalan mind
Spanish architecture
the Castilian mind
a fantasy
Read the text and choose the best answer.One of the most renowned Spanish architects of all time was Antoni Gaudi. Gaudi's emergence as one of 's preeminent artists at the end of the nineteenth century marked a milestone in the art world. Gaudi's popularity helped to bring about the acceptance and rebirth of the Catalan language, which had been banned during the literature and art. Gaudi shares his Catalonian background with two other famous Spanish artists, Pablo Picasso and Miro. The diverse ethnic background of the region greatly influenced the work of Picasso and Miro, as well as Gaudi. Thus, their works were a combination of an old history and an active, vivid imaginary world. This has sometimes been referred to as the “Catalan Mind.” Yet it was perhaps Gaudi who had the greatest talent for bringing together diverse groups, ones which others viewed as being too diametrically opposed to be capable of coming together and co-existing amicably. This was apparent not only in the artists and other individuals who surrounded him, but also in the varied styles and techniques he employed in his architecture. Much of his work can be seen in , where his structures are known as a fine representation of modernism. He also used a great variety of color in his buildings, and this art nouveau is often associated with his own unique style of design. All of these factors are what helped put him at the forefront of art movements to come: his unique ability to take on and transform traditional Spanish elements with the emerging diverse ethnic groups, merging these with his own fertile imagination, and consequently turning these forces into some of the greatest architecture the world has ever seen. The word "fertile" in the last paragraph is closest in meaning to
check_box inventive
barren
dormant
festive
Read the text and choose the best answer.One of the most renowned Spanish architects of all time was Antoni Gaudi. Gaudi's emergence as one of 's preeminent artists at the end of the nineteenth century marked a milestone in the art world. Gaudi's popularity helped to bring about the acceptance and rebirth of the Catalan language, which had been banned during the literature and art. Gaudi shares his Catalonian background with two other famous Spanish artists, Pablo Picasso and Miro. The diverse ethnic background of the region greatly influenced the work of Picasso and Miro, as well as Gaudi. Thus, their works were a combination of an old history and an active, vivid imaginary world. This has sometimes been referred to as the “Catalan Mind.” Yet it was perhaps Gaudi who had the greatest talent for bringing together diverse groups, ones which others viewed as being too diametrically opposed to be capable of coming together and co-existing amicably. This was apparent not only in the artists and other individuals who surrounded him, but also in the varied styles and techniques he employed in his architecture. Much of his work can be seen in , where his structures are known as a fine representation of modernism. He also used a great variety of color in his buildings, and this art nouveau is often associated with his own unique style of design. All of these factors are what helped put him at the forefront of art movements to come: his unique ability to take on and transform traditional Spanish elements with the emerging diverse ethnic groups, merging these with his own fertile imagination, and consequently turning these forces into some of the greatest architecture the world has ever seen. Which city is primarily associated with Gaudi today?
check_box Barcelona
Spain
Berlin
Castilia
Read the text and choose the best answer.One of the most renowned Spanish architects of all time was Antoni Gaudi. Gaudi's emergence as one of 's preeminent artists at the end of the nineteenth century marked a milestone in the art world. Gaudi's popularity helped to bring about the acceptance and rebirth of the Catalan language, which had been banned during the literature and art. Gaudi shares his Catalonian background with two other famous Spanish artists, Pablo Picasso and Miro. The diverse ethnic background of the region greatly influenced the work of Picasso and Miro, as well as Gaudi. Thus, their works were a combination of an old history and an active, vivid imaginary world. This has sometimes been referred to as the “Catalan Mind.” Yet it was perhaps Gaudi who had the greatest talent for bringing together diverse groups, ones which others viewed as being too diametrically opposed to be capable of coming together and co-existing amicably. This was apparent not only in the artists and other individuals who surrounded him, but also in the varied styles and techniques he employed in his architecture. Much of his work can be seen in , where his structures are known as a fine representation of modernism. He also used a great variety of color in his buildings, and this art nouveau is often associated with his own unique style of design. All of these factors are what helped put him at the forefront of art movements to come: his unique ability to take on and transform traditional Spanish elements with the emerging diverse ethnic groups, merging these with his own fertile imagination, and consequently turning these forces into some of the greatest architecture the world has ever seen. Which of the following adjectives best describes Gaudi?
intolerant
broad- minded
narrow-minded
cautious
Read the text and choose the best answer.One of the most renowned Spanish architects of all time was Antoni Gaudi. Gaudi's emergence as one of 's preeminent artists at the end of the nineteenth century marked a milestone in the art world. Gaudi's popularity helped to bring about the acceptance and rebirth of the Catalan language, which had been banned during the literature and art. Gaudi shares his Catalonian background with two other famous Spanish artists, Pablo Picasso and Miro. The diverse ethnic background of the region greatly influenced the work of Picasso and Miro, as well as Gaudi. Thus, their works were a combination of an old history and an active, vivid imaginary world. This has sometimes been referred to as the “Catalan Mind.” Yet it was perhaps Gaudi who had the greatest talent for bringing together diverse groups, ones which others viewed as being too diametrically opposed to be capable of coming together and co-existing amicably. This was apparent not only in the artists and other individuals who surrounded him, but also in the varied styles and techniques he employed in his architecture. Much of his work can be seen in , where his structures are known as a fine representation of modernism. He also used a great variety of color in his buildings, and this art nouveau is often associated with his own unique style of design. All of these factors are what helped put him at the forefront of art movements to come: his unique ability to take on and transform traditional Spanish elements with the emerging diverse ethnic groups, merging these with his own fertile imagination, and consequently turning these forces into some of the greatest architecture the world has ever seen. Which of the following is NOT true about Pablo Picasso?
check_box He spoke Castilian as his first language
He was from the same area as Miro.
He incorporated his background in his paintings.
He was from the same area as Gaudi.
Read the text and choose the best answer.One of the most renowned Spanish architects of all time was Antoni Gaudi. Gaudi's emergence as one of 's preeminent artists at the end of the nineteenth century marked a milestone in the art world. Gaudi's popularity helped to bring about the acceptance and rebirth of the Catalan language, which had been banned during the literature and art. Gaudi shares his Catalonian background with two other famous Spanish artists, Pablo Picasso and Miro. The diverse ethnic background of the region greatly influenced the work of Picasso and Miro, as well as Gaudi. Thus, their works were a combination of an old history and an active, vivid imaginary world. This has sometimes been referred to as the “Catalan Mind.” Yet it was perhaps Gaudi who had the greatest talent for bringing together diverse groups, ones which others viewed as being too diametrically opposed to be capable of coming together and co-existing amicably. This was apparent not only in the artists and other individuals who surrounded him, but also in the varied styles and techniques he employed in his architecture. Much of his work can be seen in , where his structures are known as a fine representation of modernism. He also used a great variety of color in his buildings, and this art nouveau is often associated with his own unique style of design. All of these factors are what helped put him at the forefront of art movements to come: his unique ability to take on and transform traditional Spanish elements with the emerging diverse ethnic groups, merging these with his own fertile imagination, and consequently turning these forces into some of the greatest architecture the world has ever seen. Which of the following is true about Gaudi’s architecture?
Most of his work has been destroyed.
He employed a wide range of colors
He rejected whatever was considered innovative.
He disdained color.
Read the text and choose the best answer.Rock BandTwo years ago, our 14-year-old son, Ben, asked us for a set of drums for his birthday. At first, we were very much against the idea because of the noise. ‘It’s better than watching television or playing computer games in my free time,’ Ben argued, ‘and it’ll keep me out of trouble.’In the end we gave in. ‘All right,’ we said, ‘but you must consider the rest of the family and the neighbours when you play.’That was just the beginning. Because drums are not the easiest instruments to transport, the other members of Ben’s band started appearing at our home with their guitars and other electrical equipment. And so, for several hours a week, the house shakes to the noise of their instruments and their teenage singing.At least Ben’s hobby has been good for our health: whenever the band start practising, my husband and I go out for a long walk. And I must admit that, although their music may sound a little strange, they are a friendly and polite group of young men. I cannot judge their musical skill - after all I didn’t expect my parents’ generation to like the same music as I did when I was a teenager - but they do play regularly in local clubs for young people.Our main worry is that they won’t spend enough time on their school work because of their musical activities, though this hasn’t happened yet. I am always stressing to Ben how important his studies are. But one thing is certain - Ben was right: it has kept him out of trouble and he is never bored.What does the writer say about the band members?
check_box Their taste in music is different from hers. hers.
They play their instruments well.
They avoid any contact with her.
Their influence on her son worries her.
Read the text and choose the best answer.Rock BandTwo years ago, our 14-year-old son, Ben, asked us for a set of drums for his birthday. At first, we were very much against the idea because of the noise. ‘It’s better than watching television or playing computer games in my free time,’ Ben argued, ‘and it’ll keep me out of trouble.’In the end we gave in. ‘All right,’ we said, ‘but you must consider the rest of the family and the neighbours when you play.’That was just the beginning. Because drums are not the easiest instruments to transport, the other members of Ben’s band started appearing at our home with their guitars and other electrical equipment. And so, for several hours a week, the house shakes to the noise of their instruments and their teenage singing.At least Ben’s hobby has been good for our health: whenever the band start practising, my husband and I go out for a long walk. And I must admit that, although their music may sound a little strange, they are a friendly and polite group of young men. I cannot judge their musical skill - after all I didn’t expect my parents’ generation to like the same music as I did when I was a teenager - but they do play regularly in local clubs for young people.Our main worry is that they won’t spend enough time on their school work because of their musical activities, though this hasn’t happened yet. I am always stressing to Ben how important his studies are. But one thing is certain - Ben was right: it has kept him out of trouble and he is never bored.What is the writer trying to do in this text?
describe her son’s hobby
give advice to teenagers
compare herself with her parents
complain about her son’s friends
Read the text and choose the best answer.Rock BandTwo years ago, our 14-year-old son, Ben, asked us for a set of drums for his birthday. At first, we were very much against the idea because of the noise. ‘It’s better than watching television or playing computer games in my free time,’ Ben argued, ‘and it’ll keep me out of trouble.’In the end we gave in. ‘All right,’ we said, ‘but you must consider the rest of the family and the neighbours when you play.’That was just the beginning. Because drums are not the easiest instruments to transport, the other members of Ben’s band started appearing at our home with their guitars and other electrical equipment. And so, for several hours a week, the house shakes to the noise of their instruments and their teenage singing.At least Ben’s hobby has been good for our health: whenever the band start practising, my husband and I go out for a long walk. And I must admit that, although their music may sound a little strange, they are a friendly and polite group of young men. I cannot judge their musical skill - after all I didn’t expect my parents’ generation to like the same music as I did when I was a teenager - but they do play regularly in local clubs for young people.Our main worry is that they won’t spend enough time on their school work because of their musical activities, though this hasn’t happened yet. I am always stressing to Ben how important his studies are. But one thing is certain - Ben was right: it has kept him out of trouble and he is never bored.What might the writer say to her son?
When are you playing at the club next?Dad and I would love to come along again.
Are you sure you finished your homework? It's more important than band practice.
Your teacher has phoned. He wants to know why you weren't at school today.
If you don't know what to do with yourself, there is a good programme on T.V in a few minutes.
Read the text and choose the best answer.Rock BandTwo years ago, our 14-year-old son, Ben, asked us for a set of drums for his birthday. At first, we were very much against the idea because of the noise. ‘It’s better than watching television or playing computer games in my free time,’ Ben argued, ‘and it’ll keep me out of trouble.’In the end we gave in. ‘All right,’ we said, ‘but you must consider the rest of the family and the neighbours when you play.’That was just the beginning. Because drums are not the easiest instruments to transport, the other members of Ben’s band started appearing at our home with their guitars and other electrical equipment. And so, for several hours a week, the house shakes to the noise of their instruments and their teenage singing.At least Ben’s hobby has been good for our health: whenever the band start practising, my husband and I go out for a long walk. And I must admit that, although their music may sound a little strange, they are a friendly and polite group of young men. I cannot judge their musical skill - after all I didn’t expect my parents’ generation to like the same music as I did when I was a teenager - but they do play regularly in local clubs for young people.Our main worry is that they won’t spend enough time on their school work because of their musical activities, though this hasn’t happened yet. I am always stressing to Ben how important his studies are. But one thing is certain - Ben was right: it has kept him out of trouble and he is never bored.Why do the band always practise at Ben’s house?
They can leave their equipment there.
It is difficult for Ben to move his drums.
Ben’s parents enjoy listening to them.
The neighbours don’t mind the noise.
Read the text and choose the best answer.Rock BandTwo years ago, our 14-year-old son, Ben, asked us for a set of drums for his birthday. At first, we were very much against the idea because of the noise. ‘It’s better than watching television or playing computer games in my free time,’ Ben argued, ‘and it’ll keep me out of trouble.’In the end we gave in. ‘All right,’ we said, ‘but you must consider the rest of the family and the neighbours when you play.’That was just the beginning. Because drums are not the easiest instruments to transport, the other members of Ben’s band started appearing at our home with their guitars and other electrical equipment. And so, for several hours a week, the house shakes to the noise of their instruments and their teenage singing.At least Ben’s hobby has been good for our health: whenever the band start practising, my husband and I go out for a long walk. And I must admit that, although their music may sound a little strange, they are a friendly and polite group of young men. I cannot judge their musical skill - after all I didn’t expect my parents’ generation to like the same music as I did when I was a teenager - but they do play regularly in local clubs for young people.Our main worry is that they won’t spend enough time on their school work because of their musical activities, though this hasn’t happened yet. I am always stressing to Ben how important his studies are. But one thing is certain - Ben was right: it has kept him out of trouble and he is never boredWhy did the writer give Ben the present he wanted?
check_box He persuaded her it would be a good idea
She knew he would use it sensibly
She wanted to reward him for working hard
He already had too many computer games.
Read the text and choose the best answer.The first two decades of this century were dominated by the microbe hunters. These hunters had tracked down one after another of the microbes responsible for the most dreaded scourges of many centuries: tuberculosis, cholera, diphtheria. But there remained some terrible diseases for which no microbe could be incriminated: scurvy, pellagra, rickets, beriberi. Then it was discovered that these diseases were caused by the lack of vitamins, a trace substance in the diet. The diseases could be prevented or cured by consuming foods that contained the vitamins. And so in the decades of the 1920's and 1930's, nutrition became a science and the vitamin hunters replaced the microbe hunters. In the 1940's and 1950's, biochemists strived to learn why each of the vitamins was essential for health. They discovered that key enzymes in metabolism depend on one or another of the vitamins as coenzymes to perform the chemistry that provides cells with energy for growth and function. Now, these enzyme hunters occupied center stage. You are aware that the enzyme hunters have been replaced by a new breed of hunters who are tracking genes-the blueprints for each of the enzymes-and are discovering the defective genes that cause inherited diseases-diabetes, cystic fibrosis. These gene hunters, or genetic engineers, use recombinant DNA technology to identify and clone genes and introduce them into bacterial cells and plants to create factories for the massive production of hormones and vaccines for medicine and for better crops for agriculture. Biotechnology has become a multibillion-dollar industry. In view of the inexorable progress in science, we can expect that the gene hunters will be replaced in the spotlight. When and by whom? Which kind of hunter will dominate the scene in the last decade of our waning century and in the early decades of the next? I wonder whether the hunters who will occupy the spotlight will be neurobiologists who apply the techniques of the enzyme and gene hunters to the functions of the brain. What to call them? The head hunters. I will return to them later. What is the main topic of the passage?
The progress of modern medical research
The microbe hunters
The potential of genetic engineering
The discovery of enzymes
Read the text and choose the best answer.The first two decades of this century were dominated by the microbe hunters. These hunters had tracked down one after another of the microbes responsible for the most dreaded scourges of many centuries: tuberculosis, cholera, diphtheria. But there remained some terrible diseases for which no microbe could be incriminated: scurvy, pellagra, rickets, beriberi. Then it was discovered that these diseases were caused by the lack of vitamins, a trace substance in the diet. The diseases could be prevented or cured by consuming foods that contained the vitamins. And so in the decades of the 1920's and 1930's, nutrition became a science and the vitamin hunters replaced the microbe hunters.The word "incriminated" is closest in meaning to
check_box blamed
investigated
produced
eliminated
Read the text and choose the best answer.The first two decades of this century were dominated by the microbe hunters. These hunters had tracked down one after another of the microbes responsible for the most dreaded scourges of many centuries: tuberculosis, cholera, diphtheria. But there remained some terrible diseases for which no microbe could be incriminated: scurvy, pellagra, rickets, beriberi. Then it was discovered that these diseases were caused by the lack of vitamins, a trace substance in the diet. The diseases could be prevented or cured by consuming foods that contained the vitamins. And so in the decades of the 1920's and 1930's, nutrition became a science and the vitamin hunters replaced the microbe hunters.The word "which" refers to
cholera
microbe
diphtheria
diseases
Read the text and choose the best answer.The first two decades of this century were dominated by the microbe hunters. These hunters had tracked down one after another of the microbes responsible for the most dreaded scourges of many centuries: tuberculosis, cholera, diphtheria. But there remained some terrible diseases for which no microbe could be incriminated: scurvy, pellagra, rickets, beriberi. Then it was discovered that these diseases were caused by the lack of vitamins, a trace substance in the diet. The diseases could be prevented or cured by consuming foods that contained the vitamins. And so in the decades of the 1920's and 1930's, nutrition became a science and the vitamin hunters replaced the microbe hunters.Which of the following can be cured by a change in diet?
Pellagra
Cholera
Cystic fibrosis
Tuberculosis
Read the text and choose the best answer.The painter Craigie Aitchison was born in Scotland. He came to London intending to study law, but went to art school instead. There he found the traditional drawing classes difficult, but still kept on painting.In his late twenties he was given money by the Italian government to study art, and became interested in early Italian artists, which shows in some of his work. He loved the greens and browns of the Italian fields and the clear light there, and wanted to put this light into his paintings.This led him to paint colours thinly one on top of another from light to dark, but he insists he's never sure what the results will be. He says, 'It's a secret - because I don't know myself. I don't start by painting yellow, knowing I'm going to put anything on top.' Like most talented people, Aitchison makes it sound easy. 'Anyone can do the colours - you can buy them. I simply notice what you put the colours next to.'Unlike some artists, he never does drawings before he starts a painting, as he feels that if he did, he might get bored and not do the painting afterwards. Instead, Aitchison changes his paintings many times before they are finished. This explains why his favourite models are people who don't ask to see their pictures while he's painting them. 'If I feel they're worried and want to look at the painting, I can't do it.'Since moving to London years ago, he has not felt part of the Scottish painting scene. He says he is not interested in following any tradition, but just paints the way he can. However, his work still influences young British painters.Aitchison prefers models who don’t
feel anxious to see the work as it’s developing.
worry about how long the work will take.
ask him about his strange method of working.
keep talking to him while he’s working.
Read the text and choose the best answer.The painter Craigie Aitchison was born in Scotland. He came to London intending to study law, but went to art school instead. There he found the traditional drawing classes difficult, but still kept on painting.In his late twenties he was given money by the Italian government to study art, and became interested in early Italian artists, which shows in some of his work. He loved the greens and browns of the Italian fields and the clear light there, and wanted to put this light into his paintings.This led him to paint colours thinly one on top of another from light to dark, but he insists he's never sure what the results will be. He says, 'It's a secret - because I don't know myself. I don't start by painting yellow, knowing I'm going to put anything on top.' Like most talented people, Aitchison makes it sound easy. 'Anyone can do the colours - you can buy them. I simply notice what you put the colours next to.'Unlike some artists, he never does drawings before he starts a painting, as he feels that if he did, he might get bored and not do the painting afterwards. Instead, Aitchison changes his paintings many times before they are finished. This explains why his favourite models are people who don't ask to see their pictures while he's painting them. 'If I feel they're worried and want to look at the painting, I can't do it.'Since moving to London years ago, he has not felt part of the Scottish painting scene. He says he is not interested in following any tradition, but just paints the way he can. However, his work still influences young British painters.What can the reader learn about Aitchison from the text?
check_box He works in a different way from other artists.
He did some paintings for the Italian government.
He often gets bored with his paintings.
He improved his drawing by going to art school.
Read the text and choose the best answer.The painter Craigie Aitchison was born in Scotland. He came to London intending to study law, but went to art school instead. There he found the traditional drawing classes difficult, but still kept on painting.In his late twenties he was given money by the Italian government to study art, and became interested in early Italian artists, which shows in some of his work. He loved the greens and browns of the Italian fields and the clear light there, and wanted to put this light into his paintings.This led him to paint colours thinly one on top of another from light to dark, but he insists he's never sure what the results will be. He says, 'It's a secret - because I don't know myself. I don't start by painting yellow, knowing I'm going to put anything on top.' Like most talented people, Aitchison makes it sound easy. 'Anyone can do the colours - you can buy them. I simply notice what you put the colours next to.'Unlike some artists, he never does drawings before he starts a painting, as he feels that if he did, he might get bored and not do the painting afterwards. Instead, Aitchison changes his paintings many times before they are finished. This explains why his favourite models are people who don't ask to see their pictures while he's painting them. 'If I feel they're worried and want to look at the painting, I can't do it.'Since moving to London years ago, he has not felt part of the Scottish painting scene. He says he is not interested in following any tradition, but just paints the way he can. However, his work still influences young British painters.What does Aitchison say about his use of colour?
He likes starting with the darkest colours first.
He understands how different colours work together.
He knows the colours he’s aiming for when he begins.
He prefers to paint with yellows, greens, and browns.
Read the text and choose the best answer.The painter Craigie Aitchison was born in Scotland. He came to London intending to study law, but went to art school instead. There he found the traditional drawing classes difficult, but still kept on painting.In his late twenties he was given money by the Italian government to study art, and became interested in early Italian artists, which shows in some of his work. He loved the greens and browns of the Italian fields and the clear light there, and wanted to put this light into his paintings.This led him to paint colours thinly one on top of another from light to dark, but he insists he's never sure what the results will be. He says, 'It's a secret - because I don't know myself. I don't start by painting yellow, knowing I'm going to put anything on top.' Like most talented people, Aitchison makes it sound easy. 'Anyone can do the colours - you can buy them. I simply notice what you put the colours next to.'Unlike some artists, he never does drawings before he starts a painting, as he feels that if he did, he might get bored and not do the painting afterwards. Instead, Aitchison changes his paintings many times before they are finished. This explains why his favourite models are people who don't ask to see their pictures while he's painting them. 'If I feel they're worried and want to look at the painting, I can't do it.'Since moving to London years ago, he has not felt part of the Scottish painting scene. He says he is not interested in following any tradition, but just paints the way he can. However, his work still influences young British painters.What is the writer trying to do in the text?
introduce readers to the artist Craigie Aitchison
explain how Craigie Aitchison has made money from painting
teach readers how to paint like Craigie Aitchison
describe particular works by Craigie Aitchison
Read the text and choose the best answer.The painter Craigie Aitchison was born in Scotland. He came to London intending to study law, but went to art school instead. There he found the traditional drawing classes difficult, but still kept on painting.In his late twenties he was given money by the Italian government to study art, and became interested in early Italian artists, which shows in some of his work. He loved the greens and browns of the Italian fields and the clear light there, and wanted to put this light into his paintings.This led him to paint colours thinly one on top of another from light to dark, but he insists he's never sure what the results will be. He says, 'It's a secret - because I don't know myself. I don't start by painting yellow, knowing I'm going to put anything on top.' Like most talented people, Aitchison makes it sound easy. 'Anyone can do the colours - you can buy them. I simply notice what you put the colours next to.'Unlike some artists, he never does drawings before he starts a painting, as he feels that if he did, he might get bored and not do the painting afterwards. Instead, Aitchison changes his paintings many times before they are finished. This explains why his favourite models are people who don't ask to see their pictures while he's painting them. 'If I feel they're worried and want to look at the painting, I can't do it.'Since moving to London years ago, he has not felt part of the Scottish painting scene. He says he is not interested in following any tradition, but just paints the way he can. However, his work still influences young British painters.What might a visitor at an exhibition say about Aitchison’s work?
I love his recent painting of Scotland, whaich are similar to a number of other Scottish painters.
I wonder if his law training helps him at all, especially in selling his works.
You can tell he spent a lot of time drawing the picture before he started painting.
You can see the influence of his trip to Italy in some of these pictures.
Read the text and choose the best answer.The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required.To what do the following pronoun "which" in the passage refer?
The Information Superhighway
computer
visual telephone link
Internet addresses or sites
Read the text and choose the best answer.The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required.Which is the topic sentence of the paragraph?
Sentence number three
Sentence number one
Sentence number two
the last sentence
Read the text and choose the best answer.Western people rely on technical and mechanical solutions in everything they do. Refrigerators preserve their food, washing machines clean their underwear and computers are supposed to solve all their problems. When they are ill, they rely on the surgeon’s knife. If their hearts are running down, then they must be repaired, if they cannot be repaired, they should be replaced, just as an old car sometimes gets a new engine. But up to now we have had a shortage of donors to give their hearts, to keep one person alive, another donor had to die.Nowadays there is more and more talk about using monkeys. Every monkey has a near-human heart, and humans have always been over careful in respecting the lives and well-being of other animals. This includes the life and well-being of other humans. Therefore, in the early years of the 22nd century - It was told the mass killings of monkeys may occur. We’ll need to use their hearts for human consumption.Monkeys, on the whole, are happier creatures than their near relatives, Homo sapiens, or man. They know fear, of course, and they face real dangers, but they are also more intelligent than us. They create no unnecessary dangers for themselves, they run no businesses, chase no money, are unimpressed by gold – that utterly useless metal, and they do not care at all about hell or evil spirits. I have a vague feeling that it is not monkeys’ hearts that we ought to implant in ourselves, but monkeys’ brains.According to the author, westerners believe heath problems can be solved by…
increasing the number of doctors
spending more money on scientific research
taking more precautions
using technical mechanical methods
Read the text and choose the best answer.Western people rely on technical and mechanical solutions in everything they do. Refrigerators preserve their food, washing machines clean their underwear and computers are supposed to solve all their problems. When they are ill, they rely on the surgeon’s knife. If their hearts are running down, then they must be repaired, if they cannot be repaired, they should be replaced, just as an old car sometimes gets a new engine. But up to now we have had a shortage of donors to give their hearts, to keep one person alive, another donor had to die.Nowadays there is more and more talk about using monkeys. Every monkey has a near-human heart, and humans have always been over careful in respecting the lives and well-being of other animals. This includes the life and well-being of other humans. Therefore, in the early years of the 22nd century - It was told the mass killings of monkeys may occur. We’ll need to use their hearts for human consumption.Monkeys, on the whole, are happier creatures than their near relatives, Homo sapiens, or man. They know fear, of course, and they face real dangers, but they are also more intelligent than us. They create no unnecessary dangers for themselves, they run no businesses, chase no money, are unimpressed by gold – that utterly useless metal, and they do not care at all about hell or evil spirits. I have a vague feeling that it is not monkeys’ hearts that we ought to implant in ourselves, but monkeys’ brains.Every monkey has a near-human heart…
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the text and choose the best answer.Western people rely on technical and mechanical solutions in everything they do. Refrigerators preserve their food, washing machines clean their underwear and computers are supposed to solve all their problems. When they are ill, they rely on the surgeon’s knife. If their hearts are running down, then they must be repaired, if they cannot be repaired, they should be replaced, just as an old car sometimes gets a new engine. But up to now we have had a shortage of donors to give their hearts, to keep one person alive, another donor had to die.Nowadays there is more and more talk about using monkeys. Every monkey has a near-human heart, and humans have always been over careful in respecting the lives and well-being of other animals. This includes the life and well-being of other humans. Therefore, in the early years of the 22nd century - It was told the mass killings of monkeys may occur. We’ll need to use their hearts for human consumption.Monkeys, on the whole, are happier creatures than their near relatives, Homo sapiens, or man. They know fear, of course, and they face real dangers, but they are also more intelligent than us. They create no unnecessary dangers for themselves, they run no businesses, chase no money, are unimpressed by gold – that utterly useless metal, and they do not care at all about hell or evil spirits. I have a vague feeling that it is not monkeys’ hearts that we ought to implant in ourselves, but monkeys’ brains.In the future, hearts of almost animals will be used in transplant operations for humans….
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the text and choose the best answer.Western people rely on technical and mechanical solutions in everything they do. Refrigerators preserve their food, washing machines clean their underwear and computers are supposed to solve all their problems. When they are ill, they rely on the surgeon’s knife. If their hearts are running down, then they must be repaired, if they cannot be repaired, they should be replaced, just as an old car sometimes gets a new engine. But up to now we have had a shortage of donors to give their hearts, to keep one person alive, another donor had to die.Nowadays there is more and more talk about using monkeys. Every monkey has a near-human heart, and humans have always been over careful in respecting the lives and well-being of other animals. This includes the life and well-being of other humans. Therefore, in the early years of the 22nd century - It was told the mass killings of monkeys may occur. We’ll need to use their hearts for human consumption.Monkeys, on the whole, are happier creatures than their near relatives, Homo sapiens, or man. They know fear, of course, and they face real dangers, but they are also more intelligent than us. They create no unnecessary dangers for themselves, they run no businesses, chase no money, are unimpressed by gold – that utterly useless metal, and they do not care at all about hell or evil spirits. I have a vague feeling that it is not monkeys’ hearts that we ought to implant in ourselves, but monkeys’ brains.Monkeys are more stupid than humans because they always create unnecessary dangers for themselves…
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the text and choose the best answer.Western people rely on technical and mechanical solutions in everything they do. Refrigerators preserve their food, washing machines clean their underwear and computers are supposed to solve all their problems. When they are ill, they rely on the surgeon’s knife. If their hearts are running down, then they must be repaired, if they cannot be repaired, they should be replaced, just as an old car sometimes gets a new engine. But up to now we have had a shortage of donors to give their hearts, to keep one person alive, another donor had to die.Nowadays there is more and more talk about using monkeys. Every monkey has a near-human heart, and humans have always been over careful in respecting the lives and well-being of other animals. This includes the life and well-being of other humans. Therefore, in the early years of the 22nd century - It was told the mass killings of monkeys may occur. We’ll need to use their hearts for human consumption.Monkeys, on the whole, are happier creatures than their near relatives, Homo sapiens, or man. They know fear, of course, and they face real dangers, but they are also more intelligent than us. They create no unnecessary dangers for themselves, they run no businesses, chase no money, are unimpressed by gold – that utterly useless metal, and they do not care at all about hell or evil spirits. I have a vague feeling that it is not monkeys’ hearts that we ought to implant in ourselves, but monkeys’ brains.Technology and technics are the keys to solve Western people's problems…
FALSE
NOT GIVEN
TRUE
Read the text and choose the best answer.Western people rely on technical and mechanical solutions in everything they do. Refrigerators preserve their food, washing machines clean their underwear and computers are supposed to solve all their problems. When they are ill, they rely on the surgeon’s knife. If their hearts are running down, then they must be repaired, if they cannot be repaired, they should be replaced, just as an old car sometimes gets a new engine. But up to now we have had a shortage of donors to give their hearts, to keep one person alive, another donor had to die.Nowadays there is more and more talk about using monkeys. Every monkey has a near-human heart, and humans have always been over careful in respecting the lives and well-being of other animals. This includes the life and well-being of other humans. Therefore, in the early years of the 22nd century - It was told the mass killings of monkeys may occur. We’ll need to use their hearts for human consumption.Monkeys, on the whole, are happier creatures than their near relatives, Homo sapiens, or man. They know fear, of course, and they face real dangers, but they are also more intelligent than us. They create no unnecessary dangers for themselves, they run no businesses, chase no money, are unimpressed by gold – that utterly useless metal, and they do not care at all about hell or evil spirits. I have a vague feeling that it is not monkeys’ hearts that we ought to implant in ourselves, but monkeys’ brains.The author says that monkeys….
Monkey hearts will be used in transplant operations
Monkey hearts will form part of our diet
Monkeys will become extinct
people will careless about other human beings
Read the text and choose the best answer.Western people rely on technical and mechanical solutions in everything they do. Refrigerators preserve their food, washing machines clean their underwear and computers are supposed to solve all their problems. When they are ill, they rely on the surgeon’s knife. If their hearts are running down, then they must be repaired, if they cannot be repaired, they should be replaced, just as an old car sometimes gets a new engine. But up to now we have had a shortage of donors to give their hearts, to keep one person alive, another donor had to die.Nowadays there is more and more talk about using monkeys. Every monkey has a near-human heart, and humans have always been over careful in respecting the lives and well-being of other animals. This includes the life and well-being of other humans. Therefore, in the early years of the 22nd century - It was told the mass killings of monkeys may occur. We’ll need to use their hearts for human consumption.Monkeys, on the whole, are happier creatures than their near relatives, Homo sapiens, or man. They know fear, of course, and they face real dangers, but they are also more intelligent than us. They create no unnecessary dangers for themselves, they run no businesses, chase no money, are unimpressed by gold – that utterly useless metal, and they do not care at all about hell or evil spirits. I have a vague feeling that it is not monkeys’ hearts that we ought to implant in ourselves, but monkeys’ brains.The author suggests that in the future…
Monkey hearts will be used in transplant operations
Monkey hearts will form part of our diet
Monkeys will become extinct
people will careless about other human beings
Read the text and choose the best answer.Western people rely on technical and mechanical solutions in everything they do. Refrigerators preserve their food, washing machines clean their underwear and computers are supposed to solve all their problems. When they are ill, they rely on the surgeon’s knife. If their hearts are running down, then they must be repaired, if they cannot be repaired, they should be replaced, just as an old car sometimes gets a new engine. But up to now we have had a shortage of donors to give their hearts, to keep one person alive, another donor had to die.Nowadays there is more and more talk about using monkeys. Every monkey has a near-human heart, and humans have always been over careful in respecting the lives and well-being of other animals. This includes the life and well-being of other humans. Therefore, in the early years of the 22nd century - It was told the mass killings of monkeys may occur. We’ll need to use their hearts for human consumption.Monkeys, on the whole, are happier creatures than their near relatives, Homo sapiens, or man. They know fear, of course, and they face real dangers, but they are also more intelligent than us. They create no unnecessary dangers for themselves, they run no businesses, chase no money, are unimpressed by gold – that utterly useless metal, and they do not care at all about hell or evil spirits. I have a vague feeling that it is not monkeys’ hearts that we ought to implant in ourselves, but monkeys’ brains.The main point the author is making is that humans…
are similar in many ways to monkeys
have no right to make use of other animals
make life more complicated than it needs to be
should worry less about growing old
Read the text and choose the best answer.Western people rely on technical and mechanical solutions in everything they do. Refrigerators preserve their food, washing machines clean their underwear and computers are supposed to solve all their problems. When they are ill, they rely on the surgeon’s knife. If their hearts are running down, then they must be repaired, if they cannot be repaired, they should be replaced, just as an old car sometimes gets a new engine. But up to now we have had a shortage of donors to give their hearts, to keep one person alive, another donor had to die.Nowadays there is more and more talk about using monkeys. Every monkey has a near-human heart, and humans have always been over careful in respecting the lives and well-being of other animals. This includes the life and well-being of other humans. Therefore, in the early years of the 22nd century - It was told the mass killings of monkeys may occur. We’ll need to use their hearts for human consumption.Monkeys, on the whole, are happier creatures than their near relatives, Homo sapiens, or man. They know fear, of course, and they face real dangers, but they are also more intelligent than us. They create no unnecessary dangers for themselves, they run no businesses, chase no money, are unimpressed by gold – that utterly useless metal, and they do not care at all about hell or evil spirits. I have a vague feeling that it is not monkeys’ hearts that we ought to implant in ourselves, but monkeys’ brains.The problem with heart transplants has been that…
artificial hearts do not work very well
many people die after the operations
some of the heart donors are too old
there are not usually enough donors
Read the text and choose the best answer.You are aware that the enzyme hunters have been replaced by a new breed of hunters who are tracking genes-the blueprints for each of the enzymes-and are discovering the defective genes that cause inherited diseases-diabetes, cystic fibrosis. These gene hunters, or genetic engineers, use recombinant DNA technology to identify and clone genes and introduce them into bacterial cells and plants to create factories for the massive production of hormones and vaccines for medicine and for better crops for agriculture. Biotechnology has become a multibillion-dollar industry. In the paragraph, the author compares cells that have been genetically altered by biotechnicians to
spotlights
factories
hunters
gardens
Read the text and choose the best answer.You are aware that the enzyme hunters have been replaced by a new breed of hunters who are tracking genes-the blueprints for each of the enzymes-and are discovering the defective genes that cause inherited diseases-diabetes, cystic fibrosis. These gene hunters, or genetic engineers, use recombinant DNA technology to identify and clone genes and introduce them into bacterial cells and plants to create factories for the massive production of hormones and vaccines for medicine and for better crops for agriculture. Biotechnology has become a multibillion-dollar industry. The word "them" refers to
hormones
genes
cells and plants
gene hunters or genetic engineers
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientistsScientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally calm when left alone were also found to have a “dog bowl half full” attitude to life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could be treated with behavioural therapy.“Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs. Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,” said Mendl. “At least some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners to talk to their vets about potential treatments,” he added. Of the ten million pet dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the researchers said.Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers, golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old. Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an anxiety score.A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other. When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’ underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.“We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,” Mendl said. “What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glass-half-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more pessimistic nature.” Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals department at the RSPCA, said: “Some dogs may be more prone to develop these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.”Question: Film of a particular subject or event _________________________.
breed
footage
Insight
outlook
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientistsScientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally calm when left alone were also found to have a “dog bowl half full” attitude to life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could be treated with behavioural therapy.“Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs. Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,” said Mendl. “At least some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners to talk to their vets about potential treatments,” he added. Of the ten million pet dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the researchers said.Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers, golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old. Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an anxiety score.A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other. When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’ underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.“We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,” Mendl said. “What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glass-half-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more pessimistic nature.” Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals department at the RSPCA, said: “Some dogs may be more prone to develop these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.”Question: How do owners respond to anxious behaviour in dogs?
They ignore the dog.
They react in different ways.
They take the dog to a refuge.
They think the dog is being intentionally spiteful.
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientistsScientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally calm when left alone were also found to have a “dog bowl half full” attitude to life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could be treated with behavioural therapy.“Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs. Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,” said Mendl. “At least some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners to talk to their vets about potential treatments,” he added. Of the ten million pet dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the researchers said.Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers, golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old. Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an anxiety score.A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other. When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’ underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.“We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,” Mendl said. “What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glass-half-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more pessimistic nature.” Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals department at the RSPCA, said: “Some dogs may be more prone to develop these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.”Question: If something is described as _________________________, it is not clear or it is capable of being understood in more than one way.
ambiguous
concerned
confirmed
underlying
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientistsScientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally calm when left alone were also found to have a “dog bowl half full” attitude to life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could be treated with behavioural therapy.“Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs. Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,” said Mendl. “At least some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners to talk to their vets about potential treatments,” he added. Of the ten million pet dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the researchers said.Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers, golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old. Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an anxiety score.A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other. When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’ underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.“We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,” Mendl said. “What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glass-half-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more pessimistic nature.” Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals department at the RSPCA, said: “Some dogs may be more prone to develop these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.”Question: If you are _________________________ to something, you are likely to be affected by it, especially if it is something bad.
Concerned
interested
Prone
Relieved
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientistsScientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally calm when left alone were also found to have a “dog bowl half full” attitude to life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could be treated with behavioural therapy.“Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs. Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,” said Mendl. “At least some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners to talk to their vets about potential treatments,” he added. Of the ten million pet dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the researchers said.Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers, golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old. Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an anxiety score.A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other. When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’ underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.“We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,” Mendl said. “What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glass-half-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more pessimistic nature.” Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals department at the RSPCA, said: “Some dogs may be more prone to develop these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.”Question: If you feel _________________________, you are worried about something.
ambiguous
concerned
prone
underlying
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientistsScientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally calm when left alone were also found to have a “dog bowl half full” attitude to life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could be treated with behavioural therapy.“Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs. Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,” said Mendl. “At least some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners to talk to their vets about potential treatments,” he added. Of the ten million pet dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the researchers said.Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers, golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old. Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an anxiety score.A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other. When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’ underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.“We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,” Mendl said. “What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glass-half-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more pessimistic nature.” Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals department at the RSPCA, said: “Some dogs may be more prone to develop these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.”Question: The more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more ---------- its outlook appeared to be.
Glad
Gloomy
Happy
Optimistic
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientistsScientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally calm when left alone were also found to have a “dog bowl half full” attitude to life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could be treated with behavioural therapy.“Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs. Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,” said Mendl. “At least some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners to talk to their vets about potential treatments,” he added. Of the ten million pet dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the researchers said.Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers, golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old. Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an anxiety score.A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other. When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’ underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.“We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,” Mendl said. “What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glass-half-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more pessimistic nature.” Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals department at the RSPCA, said: “Some dogs may be more prone to develop these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.”Question: The unusual insight into canine psychology ............from a study by Bristol University researchers.
arrived
come
emerged
existed
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientistsScientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally calm when left alone were also found to have a “dog bowl half full” attitude to life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could be treated with behavioural therapy.“Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs. Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,” said Mendl. “At least some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners to talk to their vets about potential treatments,” he added. Of the ten million pet dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the researchers said.Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers, golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old. Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an anxiety score.A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other. When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’ underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.“We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,” Mendl said. “What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glass-half-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more pessimistic nature.” Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals department at the RSPCA, said: “Some dogs may be more prone to develop these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.”Question: When did the researchers video the dogs?
when the dogs were left alone for five minutes
when the dogs were left alone for twenty minutes
when the dogs were walking over to the food bowls
while they were playing with them
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientistsScientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally calm when left alone were also found to have a “dog bowl half full” attitude to life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could be treated with behavioural therapy.“Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs. Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,” said Mendl. “At least some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners to talk to their vets about potential treatments,” he added. Of the ten million pet dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the researchers said.Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers, golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old. Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an anxiety score.A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other. When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’ underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.“We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,” Mendl said. “What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glass-half-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more pessimistic nature.” Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals department at the RSPCA, said: “Some dogs may be more prone to develop these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.”Question: Which dogs were slowest to approach the food bowls?
The most anxious dogs
the ones that had been the most anxious in the previous test
the ones that had learned the difference between the full and empty bowls
the ones that had not been trained properly
Read the text and choose the most suitable word to fill the blank.Dogs are either optimists or pessimists, claim scientistsScientists have confirmed what many pet owners have long suspected: some dogs have a more gloomy outlook on life than others. The unusual insight into canine psychology emerged from a study by Bristol University researchers into how dogs behave when separated from their owners. Dogs that were generally calm when left alone were also found to have a “dog bowl half full” attitude to life, while those that barked, relieved themselves and destroyed furniture appeared to be more pessimistic, the study concluded.Michael Mendl, head of animal welfare and behaviour at the university, said the more anxiously a dog behaved on being parted from its owner, the more gloomy its outlook appeared to be. The findings suggest that the trouble caused by some dogs when they are left alone may reflect deeper emotional problems that could be treated with behavioural therapy.“Owners vary in how they perceive this kind of anxious behaviour in dogs. Some are very concerned, some relinquish the dog to a refuge, but others think the dog is happy or even being intentionally spiteful,” said Mendl. “At least some of these dogs may have emotional issues and we would encourage owners to talk to their vets about potential treatments,” he added. Of the ten million pet dogs in the UK, around half may show separation anxiety at some stage, the researchers said.Mendl’s team studied 24 animals at two dog homes in the UK. Half of the dogs were male and they were various breeds, including Staffordshire bull terriers, golden retrievers and collies. They ranged from nine months to nine years old. Researchers began the study by going to a room with each dog in turn and playing for 20 minutes. They returned the next day, but this time left the dog alone for five minutes, during which the scientists recorded the animal’s behaviour with a video camera. The footage was used to give each dog an anxiety score.A day or two later, the dogs were trained to walk over to a food bowl that was full when placed at one end of a room and empty when placed at the other. When the dogs had learned the difference, the scientists tested the animals’ underlying mood by placing bowls in ambiguous positions – in the middle of the room, for example – and noting how quickly each dog went to the bowl.The dogs that had been most anxious in the earlier test were slowest to approach food bowls placed in or near the middle of the room, suggesting they expected to find the bowl empty. The less anxious dogs ran to the food bowls, implying they were more optimistic, according to a report in Current Biology.“We know that people’s emotional states affect their judgements and that happy people are more likely to judge an ambiguous situation positively,” Mendl said. “What our study has shown is that this applies similarly to dogs – that a glass-half-full dog is less likely to be anxious when left alone than one with a more pessimistic nature.” Samantha Gaines, deputy head of the companion animals department at the RSPCA, said: “Some dogs may be more prone to develop these behaviours and should be re-homed with appropriate owners.”Question: Which of these dogs are more likely to be optimistic, according to the study?
ones that bark when left alone
ones that destroy furniture when left alone
ones that relieved themselves
ones that remain calm when left alone
Read the text and complete the sentence.People appear to be born to compute. The numerical skills of children develop so early and so inexorably that it is easy to imagine an internal clock of mathematical maturity guiding their growth. Not long after learning to walk and talk, they can set the table with impressive accuracy — one plate, oneknife, one spoon, one fork, for each of the five chairs. Soon they are capable of noting that theyhave placed five knives, spoons, and forks on the table and, a bit later, that this amounts to fifteen pieces of silverware. Having thus mastered addition, they move on to subtraction. It seems almost reasonable to expect that if a child were secluded on a desert island at birth and retrieved seven years later, he or she could enter a second-grade mathematics class without any serious problems of intellectual adjustment.Of course, the truth is not so simple. This century, the work of cognitive psychologists has illuminated the subtle forms of daily learning on which intellectual progress depends. Children were observed as they slowly grasped — or, as the case might be, bumped into — concepts that adults take for granted, as they refused, for instance, to concede that quantity is unchanged as water pours from a short stout glass into a tall thin one. Psychologists have since demonstrated that young children, asked to count the pencils in a pile, readily report the number of blue or red pencils, but must be coaxed into finding the total. Such studies have suggested that the rudiments of mathematics are mastered gradually, and with effort. They have also suggested that the very concept of abstract numbers — the idea of a oneness, a twoness, a threeness that applies to any class of objects and is a prerequisite for doing anything more mathematically demanding than setting a table — is itself far from innate.According to the passage, when small children were asked to count a pile of red and blue pencils they.....
check_box counted the number of pencils of each color
guessed at the total number of pencils
counted only the pencils of their favorite color
subtracted the number of red pencils from the number of blue pencils
Read the text and Decide that the following statements are TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future.Everyone is aware of the Information Superhighway.
F
NG
T
Read the text and Decide that the following statements are TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future.Internet computer connections are made by using telephone lines.
check_box T
F
NG
Read the text and Decide that the following statements are TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).Almost everyone with or without a computer is aware of the latest technological revolution destined to change forever the way in which humans communicate, namely, the Information Superhighway, best exemplified by the ubiquitous Internet. Already, millions of people around the world are linked by computer simply by having a modem and an address on the 'Net', in much the same way that owning a telephone links us to almost anyone who pays a phone bill. In fact, since the computer connections are made via the phone line, the Internet can be envisaged as a network of visual telephone links. It remains to be seen in which direction the Information Superhighway is headed, but many believe it is the educational hope of the future.Using the Internet costs the owner of a telephone extra money.
check_box NG
T
F
Read the text and Decide that the following statements are TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).Anyone can set up a site; promoting your club, your institution, your company's products or simply yourself, is what the Web and the Internet is all about. And what is more, information on the Internet is not owned or controlled by anyone organisation. It is, perhaps, true to say that no-one and therefore everyone owns the 'Net'. Because of the relative freedom of access to information, the Internet has often been criticised by the media as a potentially hazardous tool in the hands of young computer users. This perception has proved to be largely false however, and the vast majority of users both young and old get connected with the Internet for the dual purposes for which it was intended – discovery and delight.According to the author, the Information Superhighway may be the future hope of education.
NG
F
T
Read the text and Decide that the following statements are TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).The World Wide Web, an enormous collection of Internet addresses or sites, all of which can be accessed for information, has been mainly responsible for the increase in interest in the Internet in the 1990s. Before the World Wide Web, the 'Net' was comparable to an integrated collection of computerised typewriters, but the introduction of the 'Web' in 1990 allowed not only text links to be made but also graphs, images and even video. A Web site consists of a 'home page', the first screen of a particular site on the computer to which you are connected, from where access can be had to other subject related 'pages' at the site and to thousands of other computers all over the world. This is achieved by a process called 'hypertext'. By clicking with a mouse device on various parts of the screen, a person connected to the 'Net' can go travelling, or 'surfing' through a web of pages to locate whatever information is required.The World Wide Web is a network of computerised typewriters.
T
NG
F
Read the text and decide that the statement is TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).An example of a bizarre occurrence regarding a species of frog dates from the summer of 1995, when 'an explosion' of multi-coloured frogs of the species Rana klepton esculenta occurred in the Netherlands. Normally these frogs are brown and greenish-brown, but some unknown contributory factor is turning these frogs yellow and/or orange. Nonetheless, so far, the unusual bi- and even tri-coloured frogs are functioning similarly to their normal-skinned contemporaries. It is thought that frogs with lighter coloured skins might be more likely to survive in an increasingly warm climate due to global warming.Highly-coloured frogs are an unusual phenomenon in nature.
check_box NG
T
F
Read the text and decide that the statement is TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).An example of a bizarre occurrence regarding a species of frog dates from the summer of 1995, when 'an explosion' of multi-coloured frogs of the species Rana klepton esculenta occurred in the Netherlands. Normally these frogs are brown and greenish-brown, but some unknown contributory factor is turning these frogs yellow and/or orange. Nonetheless, so far, the unusual bi- and even tri-coloured frogs are functioning similarly to their normal-skinned contemporaries. It is thought that frogs with lighter coloured skins might be more likely to survive in an increasingly warm climate due to global warming.The species of Rana klepton esculenta are red and blue.
check_box F
T
NG
Read the text and decide that the statement is TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).An example of a bizarre occurrence regarding a species of frog dates from the summer of 1995, when 'an explosion' of multi-coloured frogs of the species Rana klepton esculenta occurred in the Netherlands. Normally these frogs are brown and greenish-brown, but some unknown contributory factor is turning these frogs yellow and/or orange. Nonetheless, so far, the unusual bi- and even tri-coloured frogs are functioning similarly to their normal-skinned contemporaries. It is thought that frogs with lighter coloured skins might be more likely to survive in an increasingly warm climate due to global warming.The species of Rana klepton esculenta only happened in Ireland.
check_box F
NG
T
Read the text and decide that the statement is TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).The first two decades of this century were dominated by the microbe hunters. These hunters had tracked down one after another of the microbes responsible for the most dreaded scourges of many centuries: tuberculosis, cholera, diphtheria. But there remained some terrible diseases for which no microbe could be incriminated: scurvy, pellagra, rickets, beriberi. Then it was discovered that these diseases were caused by the lack of vitamins, a trace substance in the diet. The diseases could be prevented or cured by consuming foods that contained the vitamins. And so in the decades of the 1920's and 1930's, nutrition became a science and the vitamin hunters replaced the microbe hunters.Nutrition has been considered a key factor in finding treatment to many diseases.
NG
T
F
Read the text and decide that the statement is TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).The first two decades of this century were dominated by the microbe hunters. These hunters had tracked down one after another of the microbes responsible for the most dreaded scourges of many centuries: tuberculosis, cholera, diphtheria. But there remained some terrible diseases for which no microbe could be incriminated: scurvy, pellagra, rickets, beriberi. Then it was discovered that these diseases were caused by the lack of vitamins, a trace substance in the diet. The diseases could be prevented or cured by consuming foods that contained the vitamins. And so in the decades of the 1920's and 1930's, nutrition became a science and the vitamin hunters replaced the microbe hunters.Scurvy was considered to be caused by the lack of vitamins.
T
F
NG
Read the text and decide that the statement is TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).This frightening scenario is in part the consequence of a dramatic increase over the last quarter century in the development of once natural areas of wet marshland; home not only to frogs but to all manner of wildlife. Yet, there are no obvious reasons why certain frog species are disappearing from rainforests in the Southern Hemisphere which are barely touched by human hand. The mystery is unsett1ing to say the least, for it is known that amphibian species are extremely sensitive to environmental variations in temperature and moisture levels. The danger is that planet Earth might not only lose a vital link in the ecological food chain (frogs keep populations of otherwise pestilent insects at manageable levels), but we might be increasing our output of air pollutants to levels that may have already become irreversible. Frogs could be inadvertently warning us of a catastrophe.Environmental variations in temperature and moisture levels do not affect amphibians.
F
NG
T
Read the text and decide that the statement is TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).This frightening scenario is in part the consequence of a dramatic increase over the last quarter century in the development of once natural areas of wet marshland; home not only to frogs but to all manner of wildlife. Yet, there are no obvious reasons why certain frog species are disappearing from rainforests in the Southern Hemisphere which are barely touched by human hand. The mystery is unsett1ing to say the least, for it is known that amphibian species are extremely sensitive to environmental variations in temperature and moisture levels. The danger is that planet Earth might not only lose a vital link in the ecological food chain (frogs keep populations of otherwise pestilent insects at manageable levels), but we might be increasing our output of air pollutants to levels that may have already become irreversible. Frogs could be inadvertently warning us of a catastrophe.Frogs could warn us of a catastrophe by chance.
T
F
NG
Read the text and decide that the statement is TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).This frightening scenario is in part the consequence of a dramatic increase over the last quarter century in the development of once natural areas of wet marshland; home not only to frogs but to all manner of wildlife. Yet, there are no obvious reasons why certain frog species are disappearing from rainforests in the Southern Hemisphere which are barely touched by human hand. The mystery is unsett1ing to say the least, for it is known that amphibian species are extremely sensitive to environmental variations in temperature and moisture levels. The danger is that planet Earth might not only lose a vital link in the ecological food chain (frogs keep populations of otherwise pestilent insects at manageable levels), but we might be increasing our output of air pollutants to levels that may have already become irreversible. Frogs could be inadvertently warning us of a catastrophe.There are many reasons why certain frog species are disappearing from rainforests in the Southern Hemisphere.
check_box F
T
NG
Read the text and decide that the statement is TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).When was the last time you saw a frog? Chances are, if you live in a city, you have not seen one for some time. Even in wet areas once teeming with frogs and toads, it is becoming less and less easy to find those slimy, hopping and sometimes poisonous members of the animal kingdom. All over the world, even in remote jungles on the far side of the globe, frogs are losing the ecological battle for survival, and biologists are at a loss to explain their demise. Are amphibians simply over-sensitive to changes in the ecosystem? Could their rapid decline in numbers be signalling some coming environmental disaster for us all?Biologists are unable to explain why frogs are dying.
check_box T
F
NG
Read the text and decide that the statement is TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).When was the last time you saw a frog? Chances are, if you live in a city, you have not seen one for some time. Even in wet areas once teeming with frogs and toads, it is becoming less and less easy to find those slimy, hopping and sometimes poisonous members of the animal kingdom. All over the world, even in remote jungles on the far side of the globe, frogs are losing the ecological battle for survival, and biologists are at a loss to explain their demise. Are amphibians simply over-sensitive to changes in the ecosystem? Could their rapid decline in numbers be signalling some coming environmental disaster for us all?Frogs and toads are usually poisonous.
F
NG
T
Read the text and decide that the statement is TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).When was the last time you saw a frog? Chances are, if you live in a city, you have not seen one for some time. Even in wet areas once teeming with frogs and toads, it is becoming less and less easy to find those slimy, hopping and sometimes poisonous members of the animal kingdom. All over the world, even in remote jungles on the far side of the globe, frogs are losing the ecological battle for survival, and biologists are at a loss to explain their demise. Are amphibians simply over-sensitive to changes in the ecosystem? Could their rapid decline in numbers be signalling some coming environmental disaster for us all?Frogs are disappearing only from city areas.
check_box F
T
NG
Read the text and decide that the statement is TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).When was the last time you saw a frog? Chances are, if you live in a city, you have not seen one for some time. Even in wet areas once teeming with frogs and toads, it is becoming less and less easy to find those slimy, hopping and sometimes poisonous members of the animal kingdom. All over the world, even in remote jungles on the far side of the globe, frogs are losing the ecological battle for survival, and biologists are at a loss to explain their demise. Are amphibians simply over-sensitive to changes in the ecosystem? Could their rapid decline in numbers be signalling some coming environmental disaster for us all?This frightening scenario is in part the consequence of a dramatic increase over the last quarter century in the development of once natural areas of wet marshland; home not only to frogs but to all manner of wildlife. Yet, there are no obvious reasons why certain frog species are disappearing from rainforests in the Southern Hemisphere which are barely touched by human hand. The mystery is unsett1ing to say the least, for it is known that amphibian species are extremely sensitive to environmental variations in temperature and moisture levels. The danger is that planet Earth might not only lose a vital link in the ecological food chain (frogs keep populations of otherwise pestilent insects at manageable levels), but we might be increasing our output of air pollutants to levels that may have already become irreversible. Frogs could be inadvertently warning us of a catastrophe.Frogs are important in the ecosystem because they control pests.
T
NG
F
Read the text and decide that the statement is TRUE (T), FALSE (F) or NOT GIVEN (NG).You are aware that the enzyme hunters have been replaced by a new breed of hunters who are tracking genes-the blueprints for each of the enzymes-and are discovering the defective genes that cause inherited diseases-diabetes, cystic fibrosis. These gene hunters, or genetic engineers, use recombinant DNA technology to identify and clone genes and introduce them into bacterial cells and plants to create factories for the massive production of hormones and vaccines for medicine and for better crops for agriculture. Biotechnology has become a multibillion-dollar industry. Everyone uses recombinant DNA technology to identify and clone genes.
check_box F
NG
T
Read the text and decide that the statement is True (T), False (F) or Not Given (NG). Thus, in this explanation the subject merges his unique personality and personal and moral code with that of larger institutional structures, surrendering individual properties like loyalty, self-sacrifice and discipline to the service of malevolent systems of authority. Here we have two radically different explanations for why so many teacher-subjects were willing to forgot their sense of personal responsibility for the sake of an institutional authority figure. The problem for biologists, psychologists and anthropologists is to sort out which of these two polar explanations is more plausible. This, in essence, is the problem of modern sociobiology - to discover the degree to which hard-wired genetic programming dictates, or at least strongly biases, the interaction of animals and humans with their environment, that is, their behaviour. Put another way, sociobiology is concerned with elucidating the biological basis of all behaviour. In a sociological explanation, personal values are more powerful than authority.
check_box F
T
NG
Read the text and decide that the statement is True (T), False (F) or Not Given (NG).A few years ago, in one of the most fascinating and disturbing experiments in behavioural psychology, Stanley Milgram of Yale University tested 40 subjects from all walks of life for their willingness to obey instructions given by a 'leader' in a situation in which the subjects might feel a personal distaste for the actions they were called upon to perform. Specifically, Milgram told each volunteer 'teacher-subject' that the experiment was in the noble cause of education, and was designed to test whether or not punishing pupils for their mistakes would have a positive effect on the pupils' ability to learn. Several of the subjects were psychology students at Yale University.
NG
F
T
Read the text and decide that the statement is True (T), False (F) or Not Given (NG).Although the central region of Mexico's high plateau has been inhabited for at least 20,000 years, Mexico City only dates back to the 14th century. The Aztecs, or Mexica, had reached this area in the previous century, eventually settling on an island in Lake Texcoco. Here, in 1325, the city of Tenochtitlan began to take shape.The lake was shallow, and during the nearly 200 years until 1519, the Aztecs expanded the inhabited area by land refill and the creation of artificial islands. Canals were dug for the transportation of goods and people. Aqueducts were constructed to bring drinking water from natural springs outside the city, dams to protect it against floods, and causeways and bridges to connect the city with the shore. There were many houses, palaces, temples, squares, markets and even a zoo. Perhaps the most striking construction of this period is the Templo Mayor, a double pyramid which still survives. As the capital of an empire stretching from Texas to Honduras, Tenochtitlan was a magnificent and important city. When the Spanish arrived, they called it the 'Venice of the New World'. Mexico City and the central region of the high plateau have been inhabited for the same length of time.
check_box F
NG
T
Read the text and decide that the statement is True (T), False (F) or Not Given (NG).Although the central region of Mexico's high plateau has been inhabited for at least 20,000 years, Mexico City only dates back to the 14th century. The Aztecs, or Mexica, had reached this area in the previous century, eventually settling on an island in Lake Texcoco. Here, in 1325, the city of Tenochtitlan began to take shape.The lake was shallow, and during the nearly 200 years until 1519, the Aztecs expanded the inhabited area by land refill and the creation of artificial islands. Canals were dug for the transportation of goods and people. Aqueducts were constructed to bring drinking water from natural springs outside the city, dams to protect it against floods, and causeways and bridges to connect the city with the shore. There were many houses, palaces, temples, squares, markets and even a zoo. Perhaps the most striking construction of this period is the Templo Mayor, a double pyramid which still survives. As the capital of an empire stretching from Texas to Honduras, Tenochtitlan was a magnificent and important city. When the Spanish arrived, they called it the 'Venice of the New World'. The area where people lived was artificially increased between 1325 and 1519.
NG
F
T
Read the text and decide that the statement is True (T), False (F) or Not Given (NG).Although the central region of Mexico's high plateau has been inhabited for at least 20,000 years, Mexico City only dates back to the 14th century. The Aztecs, or Mexica, had reached this area in the previous century, eventually settling on an island in Lake Texcoco. Here, in 1325, the city of Tenochtitlan began to take shape.The lake was shallow, and during the nearly 200 years until 1519, the Aztecs expanded the inhabited area by land refill and the creation of artificial islands. Canals were dug for the transportation of goods and people. Aqueducts were constructed to bring drinking water from natural springs outside the city, dams to protect it against floods, and causeways and bridges to connect the city with the shore. There were many houses, palaces, temples, squares, markets and even a zoo. Perhaps the most striking construction of this period is the Templo Mayor, a double pyramid which still survives. As the capital of an empire stretching from Texas to Honduras, Tenochtitlan was a magnificent and important city. When the Spanish arrived, they called it the 'Venice of the New World'. The Aztecs generally preferred to live on islands.
check_box NG
F
T
Read the text and decide that the statement is True (T), False (F) or Not Given (NG).Although the central region of Mexico's high plateau has been inhabited for at least 20,000 years, Mexico City only dates back to the 14th century. The Aztecs, or Mexica, had reached this area in the previous century, eventually settling on an island in Lake Texcoco. Here, in 1325, the city of Tenochtitlan began to take shape.The lake was shallow, and during the nearly 200 years until 1519, the Aztecs expanded the inhabited area by land refill and the creation of artificial islands. Canals were dug for the transportation of goods and people. Aqueducts were constructed to bring drinking water from natural springs outside the city, dams to protect it against floods, and causeways and bridges to connect the city with the shore. There were many houses, palaces, temples, squares, markets and even a zoo. Perhaps the most striking construction of this period is the Templo Mayor, a double pyramid which still survives. As the capital of an empire stretching from Texas to Honduras, Tenochtitlan was a magnificent and important city. When the Spanish arrived, they called it the 'Venice of the New World'. The Spanish had heard of Tenochtitlan before they reached Mexico.
check_box NG
T
F
Read the text and decide that the statement is True (T), False (F) or Not Given (NG).In the 18th century, too, many new buildings were constructed. It was a prosperous period, when the new aristocracy paid for splendid buildings, banquets and balls, not to mention the latest fashions from Europe. The rise of Napoleon in the early 19th century led to political changes throughout Europe. An uprising took place in Mexico in l810, with the aim of ending rule from Spain. This goal was finally achieved in 1821, when Mexico City briefly became the capital of the Mexican Empire. Since 1823, it has been the capital of the Republic of Mexico, apart from a short period, from 1863 to 1867, when the country was again an empire. Since 1823, Mexico has always been a republic.
check_box F
T
NG
Read the text and decide that the statement is True (T), False (F) or Not Given (NG).The lake was shallow, and during the nearly 200 years until 1519, the Aztecs expanded the inhabited area by land refill and the creation of artificial islands. Canals were dug for the transportation of goods and people. Aqueducts were constructed to bring drinking water from natural springs outside the city, dams to protect it against floods, and causeways and bridges to connect the city with the shore. There were many houses, palaces, temples, squares, markets and even a zoo. Perhaps the most striking construction of this period is the Templo Mayor, a double pyramid which still survives. As the capital of an empire stretching from Texas to Honduras, Tenochtitlan was a magnificent and important city. When the Spanish arrived, they called it the 'Venice of the New World'. The Spanish began their conquest of Mexico in 1519 and came close to Tenochtitlan the same year. In 1521, they took control of it, after fierce fighting that destroyed most of the city. A new capital, with a new name, was built on the ruins, using Spanish architectural styles. One part of the lake was filled in to join the island to the shore, and Mexico City became the capital of the wealthiest colony in the Americas, the centre of trade between Spain and China. The Aztec inhabitants of Tenochtitlan left when the city was conquered
check_box NG
T
F
Read the text and decide that the statement is True (T), False (F) or Not Given (NG).The rise of Napoleon in the early 19th century led to political changes throughout Europe. An uprising took place in Mexico in l810, with the aim of ending rule from Spain. This goal was finally achieved in 1821, when Mexico City briefly became the capital of the Mexican Empire. Since 1823, it has been the capital of the Republic of Mexico, apart from a short period, from 1863 to 1867, when the country was again an empire. In the first few decades of the 20th century, plans were drawn up for the urbanisation of Mexico City; slum-clearance and housing development programmes were introduced, and factories spread through the city. During the 20th century, the population grew fast, and the city is now one of the largest in the world. It has changed a great deal since it was founded nearly 700 years ago. Industrialisation of Mexico City took place in the early part of the 20th century.
check_box T
F
NG
Sami wants to find some ideas for keeping fit at home and communicate online with other people doing the same thing. He doesn’t want to have to pay for using the website.FIND THE PERFECT WAY TO KEEP FIT WITH THESE WEBSITESE www.swavedon.com Swavedon is a national park with a lake, which offers many different ways of keeping fit in the great outdoors. There are three cycle routes, a jogging track around the lake and several woodland walks.F www.fitnessonline.co.uk This is a free government website that encourages people to keep fit. It gives diet advice, and allows you to work through a fitness programme without leaving your house. It also offers advice on gym equipment to buy and has a chatroom, where you can compare experiences with others.G www.fitnessclub.co.uk This website tells you all you need to know about this chain of gyms, including where your nearest Fitnessclub gym is, how you can become a member and how much the yearly fee is. Advice is given on everything from using a running machine to buying the right equipment. Each gym has a swimming pool and a shop selling gymwear.H www.sportsarena.co.uk This website tells you how you can keep fit at this group of London sports centres. You don't have to be a member - these centres operate a pay-as-you-go system. They all have a pool, squash courts, gym and outdoor tennis courts. The website includes details of locations, opening times and prices.Decide which website would be the most suitable for Sami.
check_box www.fitnessonline.co.uk
www.swavedon.com
www.sportsarena.co.uk
www.fitnessclub.co.uk
Stefano is a student and is looking for a gym where he can keep fit. He wants to pay each time he visits the gym rather than paying a fee to become a member.FIND THE PERFECT WAY TO KEEP FIT WITH THESE WEBSITESE www.swavedon.com Swavedon is a national park with a lake, which offers many different ways of keeping fit in the great outdoors. There are three cycle routes, a jogging track around the lake and several woodland walks.F www.fitnessonline.co.uk This is a free government website that encourages people to keep fit. It gives diet advice, and allows you to work through a fitness programme without leaving your house. It also offers advice on gym equipment to buy and has a chatroom, where you can compare experiences with others.G www.fitnessclub.co.uk This website tells you all you need to know about this chain of gyms, including where your nearest Fitnessclub gym is, how you can become a member and how much the yearly fee is. Advice is given on everything from using a running machine to buying the right equipment. Each gym has a swimming pool and a shop selling gymwear.H www.sportsarena.co.uk This website tells you how you can keep fit at this group of London sports centres. You don't have to be a member - these centres operate a pay-as-you-go system. They all have a pool, squash courts, gym and outdoor tennis courts. The website includes details of locations, opening times and prices.Decide which website would be the most suitable for Stefano?
check_box www.sportsarena.co.uk
www.fitnessonline.co.uk
www.fitnessclub.co.uk
www.swavedon.com

Nếu bạn thấy tài liệu này có ích và muốn tặng chúng tớ 1 ly café
Hãy mở Momo hoặc ViettelPay và quét QRCode. Đây là sự động viên khích lệ rất lớn với chúng tớ và là nguồn lực không nhỏ để duy trì website

Momo
ViettelPay

Không tìm thấy đáp án? Cần hỗ trợ hoàn thành môn học EHOU? Cần tư vấn về học trực tuyến hay bạn chỉ muốn góp ý?
ZALO|TELE 08 3533 8593